Gujarati/All Indian languages: writing the full stop/period

spbone

New Member
Hindi, Gujarati, English
Is it okay to use the । पूर्ण विराम as the Gujarati (ગુજરાતી) પૂર્ણ વિરામ?

Is the । that's used in other Indian language scripts such as Devanagari (Hindi, Marathi), Gurmukhi (Punjabi) and Eastern Nagari (Bengali), used in Gujarati? I'd prefer using it because it's more Indian than the round full stop, but would that be correct? I've never seen । being used instead of . in the Gujarati language.
 
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  • tonyspeed

    Senior Member
    English & Creole - Jamaica
    Is the । that's used in other Indian language scripts such as Devanagari (Hindi, Marathi), Gurmukhi (Punjabi) and Eastern Nagari (Bengali), used in Gujarati? I'd prefer using it because it's more Indian than the round full stop, but would that be correct? I've never seen । being used instead of . in the Gujarati language.

    "More Indian" is subjective. All punctuation in written Indian languages, no matter the sign, came about because of the influence of European languages.
     

    mundiya

    Senior Member
    Hindi, English, Punjabi
    "More Indian" is subjective. All punctuation in written Indian languages, no matter the sign, came about because of the influence of European languages.

    Can you state a source that says all punctuation, including the DanDaa/puurn viraam, is due to European influence?
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I'd prefer the full stop in Gujarati for two reasons: one, that it is the convention, and second, that we already have a very similar sign (the maatraa for "aa"), so why to burden a reader's eyes. The second reason is of course valid in languages like Hindi, too, and I would have preferred a full stop (or a double bar, as seen in Sanskrit verses) even in Hindi if not for convention.
     

    tonyspeed

    Senior Member
    English & Creole - Jamaica
    Can you state a source that says all punctuation, including the DanDaa/puurn viraam, is due to European influence?

    Have not conclusively found a source pointing to European influence yet, but here are a few sources.

    Sanskrit Computational Linguistics
    No punctuation in Sanskrit ? - "Even the and above, are not punctuation marks but are simply ways of arranging the text in the form of verses."

    This one points to European influence, namely Duncan Forbes, and the resulting shock he caused by using punctuation: A History of the Hindi Grammatical Tradition

    Here is the discussion of punctuation by Duncan Forbes in his Hindi Grammar, which was the most-used Hindi grammar of the 19th century: A Grammar of the Hindūstānī Language
     
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    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    It is a sort of common knowledge in Bengal, that Ishwarchandra Vidyasagar invented the modern punctuation for Bengali prose on the model of English. पूर्ण विराम, of course, had occurred in India for a long time, but as tonyspeed pointed out, it was not a punctuation mark in the modern sense - at least not in poetry. Sentences often run across them in Sanskrit poetry, and sometimes, though less often, end somewhere else than at them.
     
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