Gujarati, Hindi: उसने खेती करनी छोड़ दी

Dussoye

New Member
Hindi -Delhi
उसने खेती करनी छोड़ दी...I have a doubt about the tenses...Karni and di...Is it right??
 
  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    The sentence quoted in Hindi is correct. Some might say "khetii karnaa". If this option is taken, then the sentence would be " us ne khetii karnaa choR diyaa".

    There is also the option of just using "khetii" or "khetii-baaRii" as in:

    us ne khetii/ khetii-baaRii choR diii.

    khetii-karnaa/khetii-karnii is a noun and is not in any tense format.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I feel like the following question is vaguely related-- i.e. about infinitives agreeing with objects-- so I'll post it here. I know we've dealt with it before, but I am confused by the addition of the impersonal subject and what this means for the sentence

    Again, in a Hindi context:

    We have to (go) take them to the airport.
    Hamein unko airport... and then I get confused:
    • lene hai(n?)
    • lena hai(n?)
    • lene jaana hai(n?)
    • le jaana hai
    • le jaane hai

    Also, clearly I have no ear for when to use lena vs. le jaana here.

    Thank you
     

    aevynn

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, Hindi
    hameN unko airport le ke/kar jaanaa hai.

    Grammatically --- I think the infinitive verb phrase unko airport leke jaanaa is formally the "subject" of the sentence. The VP has no (unmarked) direct object, so it's masculine singular -- thus the singular hai rather than plural haiN (and in the past tense, it'd be a thaa).

    Regarding lenaa ---

    take a thing from someone = kisii se kuchh lenaa
    take something(/someone) somewhere = kuchh(/kisii ko) kahiiN le [ke/kar] jaanaa
    go somewhere to pick something(/someone) up = kahiiN kuchh(/kisii ko) lene jaanaa

    Also, I feel like there's a slight difference in meaning between le jaanaa and leke/lekar jaanaa, but I'm having trouble pinpointing it precisely... But maybe that's a topic for another thread :)
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Also, I feel like there's a slight difference in meaning between le jaanaa and leke/lekar jaanaa, but I'm having trouble pinpointing it precisely... But maybe that's a topic for another thread :)
    "le jaanaa" would work for a thing; for a person in this situation, it would make it feel more of a burden or that the person is unable to take care of him/herself, etc.; it can also be more rough-sounding when context implies that a person has to be taken somewhere. "le kar/ke jaanaa" feels more involved, more careful (not necessarily caring), when it comes to a person.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    Thanks.

    Is it fair to say in the progressive that le jaanaa doesn't work, even for a thing?

    For example:

    - Tomorrow I'm taking my computer to the store to be repaired.

    Kal maiN computer theek karne ke liye dukaan (le ja rahaa huN sounds off, no? Or maybe I am overthinking it). Would leke ja rahaa huN be any better in this context?
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Thanks.

    Is it fair to say in the progressive that le jaanaa doesn't work, even for a thing?

    For example:

    - Tomorrow I'm taking my computer to the store to be repaired.

    Kal maiN computer theek karne ke liye dukaan (le ja rahaa huN sounds off, no? Or maybe I am overthinking it). Would leke ja rahaa huN be any better in this context?
    It does work, and is very standard. "kal maiN apne computer ko repairing ke liye dukaan le jaa rahaa hooN". You can also say "le ke jaa rahaa hooN", that makes the future more immersive.
     

    amiramir

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    Thank you. Earlier @marrish ji once kindly explained to me that '(taiyaar) ho jaa rahaa huN' doesn't work:

    It would be based on 'ho jaanaa', wouldn't it? main taiyaar ho jaataa huuN, phir chalte haiN is alright but ho jaa rahaa huuN not. The 'jaanaa' modifier indicates more or less that the action is completed (likewise denaa, lenaa, chhoRnaa, baiThnaa etc when made into 'intensive' verbs) so the present continuous tense is incompatible with 'ho jaanaa'.
    so I silly-ly decided in my head that all infinitive stem + progressive jaanaa is disallowed (because actions aren't complete). Along the lines of 'he is dying (not: vo mar jaa rahaa hai, but rather voh mar rahaa hai).
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Well, "taiyaar ho jaa rahaa hooN" is indeed bad. One could say "taiyaar hue jaa rahaa hai", but that's a different thing. Similarly, you could say "voh mare jaa rahaa hai" - often does not mean literal "dying".
     
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