gwazdać

Maroseika

Moderator
Russian
Is there in the modern Polish this verb gwazdać - to soil? Maybe also other words with the same stem such as gwazda - slush, dirt?
What's about other Slavic languages (except Russian): any words with this stem meaning something dirty?
 
  • BezierCurve

    Senior Member
    I've never come across this word. The closest to it would be probably "gwizda" - from "gwizdać" (to whistle). However, I've managed to google it out:

    GWAZDAĆ: "niestarannie szyć" - "to sew carelessly" - that website was dedicated to a dialect from Uszew (Southern Poland), so it's quite possible that there are other places where you can encounter this verb. Another place where you can find it is a story by Henryk Sienkiewicz (Szkice węglem), where the meaning of it would be something like "to write carelessly".

    In the old Polish there was a word "gwozd" - "wood", "forest", but then again, the meaning is different from what you are looking for.

    There is also a verb "gazdować" - from "gazda" - a regional name for a farmer, which simply means "to be a gazda".

    I'm not sure about other Slavic languages though.
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    GWAZDAĆ: "niestarannie szyć" - "to sew carelessly" - that website was dedicated to a dialect from Uszew (Southern Poland), so it's quite possible that there are other places where you can encounter this verb. Another place where you can find it is a story by Henryk Sienkiewicz (Szkice węglem), where the meaning of it would be something like "to write carelessly".

    In the old Polish there was a word "gwozd" - "wood", "forest", but then again, the meaning is different from what you are looking for.
    It seems to me this gwazdać you have described is rather connected with gwozd - forest, in Eastern Slavic meaning "nail". Other Slavic lang. have a bit different forms for the nail: Czech hvozděj (wooden mandrel), Slovac hvozd, Polish gwóźdź, góźdź, High Luzhits hózdź, Low Luzhitz gózdź.
    In Russian there is a verb гвоздить - to nail. Sewing is rather similar to nailing due to the numerous small holes.

    However, what's about Old-Polish? Maybe there gwazda could mean dirt?
     

    BezierCurve

    Senior Member
    I'd say you might be right, as all the meanings that I've found have something in common - something that was supposed to be done with care has been done carelessly, leaving some unpleasant marks (like walking with dirty shoes on a clean carpet ;)). So it's quite possible that "gwazda" meant "dirt" at some stage.

    Sorry I couldn't help you more with that one. Maybe there is someone more familiar with it, let's wait and see...
     
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