Hören Sie den Studenten? (accusative)

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  • flame

    Senior Member
    German-Austria
    If Studenten is singular is the following correct?
    der Student singular
    die Studenten plural

    Hoören Sie den Studenten? singular accusative
    Did the student hear? (Sing)

    < ... >
    Thanks.

    Hören Sie den Studenten? (formal you is subject, student is object)
    Do you hear the student?


    Did the student hear?
    Hat der Student gehört?
    Hörte der Student?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    Originally Posted by bluetoonwithcarrotandnail
    If Studenten is singular is the following correct?
    der Student singular
    die Studenten plural

    Hoören Sie den Studenten? singular accusative
    Did the student hear? (Sing)



    I'm confused. Is this right?

    der Student singular nom
    die Studenten plural nom

    den Studenten singular accusative
    den Studenten plural accusative

    The book says use '-n' for singular and '-en' for plural and I only see '-en' being used above.

    Thanks.
     

    ablativ

    Senior Member
    German(y)
    Originally Posted by bluetoonwithcarrotandnail
    If Studenten is singular is the following correct?
    der Student singular
    die Studenten plural

    Hören Sie den Studenten? singular accusative :tick: You could also say Hören Sie den Student?:tick: This would be even more colloquial.
    Did the student hear? (Sing) No, we hear the student sing(ing). Wir hören (ich höre), wie der Student singt. Ich höre den Student singen.



    I'm confused. Is this right?

    der Student singular nom :tick:
    die Studenten plural nom :tick:

    den Studenten singular accusative :tick: (or: den Student)
    den Studenten plural accusative :cross: die Studenten :tick: (nom. = acc. in this case)

    The book says use '-n' for singular and '-en' for plural and I only see '-en' being used above.

    Maybe your book is talking about Herr (there was another mistake that hasn't been corrected yet).

    Frag Herrn Kluge! If you were to ask more than one gentleman, then you would have to say Frag die Herren Kluge und Schmitz!

    Thanks.
     
    Is there a rule for when '-n' is used and when '-en' is used? In Latin
    'ex' is used when the word after it starts with a vowel. 'e' is used in
    Latin when the word after it starts with a consonant. Is this the same
    thing which is happening with 'Der Herr' and 'Der Student'?

    Thanks.
     

    ablativ

    Senior Member
    German(y)
    'e' is used in
    Latin when the word after it starts with a consonant.

    Not necessarily ! There are plenty of words when 'ex' is used even though the word after it starts with a consonant, such as exclamare, exspectare and so on. Others do use 'e' in such cases like elegere, evidere. There is no specific rule you can rely on.

    But you are right that if the following word starts with a vowel, one always has to use 'ex' rather than 'e'.

    Being a native German speaker, I instinctively know how to use the direct object. Maybe someone else can explain that to you if there are any rules at all. I've been thinking about your question for a long time, but unfortunately I cannot come up with an explanation. Sorry about that !

    abl.
     
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