h -> g

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Villeggiatura

Senior Member
Russian
Interlingual h-g sound change is common when Russian is involved:
Harmonia - Garmonia
Horowitz - Gorowitz
Bohemia - Bogemia
Valhalla - Valgalla

I know an example of interlingual h-g sound change involving multiple languages:
Praha - Praga, Prague, Prag

Are there many more such examples?
 
  • Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    If I recall correctly, h > g in Russian was originally a hypercorrection motivated by the opposite change, g > h, in Ukrainian (e.g. Oleh is the Ukrainian equivalent of Oleg).

    So, this case of h > g is not a "sound change" so much as a sporadic substitution pattern in foreign words.

    Prague for Praha is either a similar hypercorrection, or an older pronunciation (predating the shift of Slavic g > Czech h) that has been retained outside of Czech.
     
    Last edited:

    yezik

    Banned
    Russian, eng ., french
    Are there many more such examples?

    ipo-ten-uza --- hypo-ten-ouse ---- гипо-тен-уза
    ummo - humo - гуманитарий . G came from nowhere..... From a throat.
     

    Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    Prague for Praha is either a similar hypercorrection, or an older pronunciation (predating the shift of Slavic g > Czech h) that has been retained outside of Czech.
    Praga, Prague, Prag ... were all borrowed from Czech before its g>h shift, so in this particular case foreign languages maintain the original pronunciation.
     
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