H-reduction vs. Stop T+H?

zdcm519

Member
Chinese
hi, recently i have been learning the H-reduction, as in the link "FLUENT ENGLISH: The “H” Reduction in American English Pronunciation | Rachel’s English",

i find it very interesting and useful for me, and with all the rules she taught me in mind, i'd also like to share some of my unmature thoughts of h-reduction based on my observations on here. appeciate if you'd help guide and point out wherever i am wrong. thank you very much!


examples:

get him

contact him

against her

reached him,

let her

lost her,

get help,

don't hold.....

hit his.....

need help,.....


i noticed when "t" is followed by "her", "him" or "his" and other "h"words, the "t" is a stop t, or sometimes may be a "flap t" or "true t" when h is reduced.


STOP T:

for example, le(t) her, don'(t) help, here the shape of "t" is formed in mouth, yet air of it not fully released or slightly released, namely a stop T. Thus making "let her" sound "le(t) her", "don't help" sound like "don'(t) help", we can hear the "h" here, and even at times we may hear the "stop t" slightly as in "le(t) her", and even hear the "t" linking "her" a bit. my take is, the Stop T is slightly released, thus i can hear it and it naturally glides to link the h-word after it.


H-reduction with "t linking" under Flap T/True T:

For the same words above, I noticed other people would reduce the "h" totally, making "t" link with "h"word, as in "let 'er" or " le der", either a flap t or a true t sometimes..... ( maybe more British when it's a true T?).

I also notice the h-reduction usually happens especially when "h" is after "t clusters"(nt/st/kt/lt), for example, "lost 'er", "contact 'ihm" or "reached 'is", and the "t" here can be either a true t or a flap t to do the linking of vowel, depending on the speaker's personal habbit.


the same obersational conclusions occur to "d"+"h"word, as in "need help", I noticed some people will use a "stop d" , making the phrase sound like "nee(d) help", while others just simply reduce the "h" and thus it becomes "need 'elp"


thank you!

these are all my observations, thank you again!
 
  • zdcm519

    Member
    Chinese
    Is there a specific question you want to ask?
    simply speaking,

    when words ending with "t" meets with words beginning with"h", could this "t" be pronounced as either "stop t", or "flap t" , or "true t", all just all of these three cases are correct, ?

    as for me, it is a bit complicated, thus i cannot just put the question in one sentence, sorry and thanks!

    +
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    It depends on, among other things,
    • your accent
    • whether the word beginning with <h> is a grammatical word or a lexical word
    For instance, I never flap my <t>, and sometimes a glottal stop might creep in with the /t/, occasionally replacing the /t/.

    If you have a word beginning with <h> as a grammatical word, it often loses the /h/. No /h/ when I say, 'Get her a drink!' or 'Get here quick!' But the /h/ is definitely there for 'Get Hector a drink!'
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Always keep in mind that Rachel's English is only about American English. She doesn't cover other varieties.

    In my AE experience, her and him commonly lose their h sound in that sort of context. But hold and help do not.

    Get her over here = Get 'er over here.
    Get help now = Get help now.

    Both t's are stop t's for me.
     

    zdcm519

    Member
    Chinese
    It depends on, among other things,
    • your accent
    • whether the word beginning with <h> is a grammatical word or a lexical word
    For instance, I never flap my <t>, and sometimes a glottal stop might creep in with the /t/, occasionally replacing the /t/.

    If you have a word beginning with <h> as a grammatical word, it often loses the /h/. No /h/ when I say, 'Get her a drink!' or 'Get here quick!' But the /h/ is definitely there for 'Get Hector a drink!'
    thank you, appreciate you shared and guided me on the difference between gramatical word and lexical word.'
     

    zdcm519

    Member
    Chinese
    Always keep in mind that Rachel's English is only about American English. She doesn't cover other varieties.

    In my AE experience, her and him commonly lose their h sound in that sort of context. But hold and help do not.

    Get her over here = Get 'er over here.
    Get help now = Get help now.

    Both t's are stop t's for me.
    thanks a lot, you mean, you may say both "t's" and "stop t's" before "help", right? is it a true t or a flap t when you say t's?
     
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