Habibi حبيبي

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Rob625

Senior Member
English - England
Can someone tell me what 'habibi' means, and what language it is? No context, I'm afraid; I have only come across it used as a name, but I think it does mean something.
 
  • CLEMENTINE

    Senior Member
    SWITZERLAND / FRENCH
    Hello

    Some of my friends say sometime "habibi, brother" when meeting a friend - that would means something like "my dear old friend"
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hi Rob,

    Years ago I studied some medieval Spanish/Arabic love poetry. The word was used frequently in those poems. I was taught that it meant "beloved one" in the Arabic of the time. Here is a modern translation of a popular song. It seems that the meaning has endured for hundreds of years.

    http://www.shira.net/nourelain.htm

    cheers,
    Cuchu
     

    Janna82

    Senior Member
    Jordan/Arabic, English
    Hi everyone,
    that's true what has just been said, habibi (which is not pronounced H, it's another pronounciation in Arabic) generates from the word love, so basically yes it means my beloved one, but it's not just for like 2 inlove, it can be said with a mother and her son..... etc, please note that in Arabic there are not seperate words for the verbs like & love, they are the same, so we would say the father loves his child & the girlfriend loves her boyfriend! Hope that helped ;)
    Cheers
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Janna82 said:
    Hi everyone,
    that's true what has just been said, habibi (which is not pronounced H, it's another pronounciation in Arabic) generates from the word love, so basically yes it means my beloved one, but it's not just for like 2 inlove, it can be said with a mother and her son..... etc, please note that in Arabic there are not seperate words for the verbs like & love, they are the same, so we would say the father loves his child & the girlfriend loves her boyfriend! Hope that helped ;)
    Cheers
    Let me put it in two pieces, Paradise :) :

    حبيب —> darling, lover
    ـي —> my

    And here you can see how to pronounce this special H:
    ح is like a whispered, spitting English 'h'. If you say 'hello' and don't want to say it aloud, but emphasized, you can get the ح-sound [I transcribe it with ħ]. Or run up huge stairs and then say "hello", you'll get this beautiful sound.
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Yup , Whodunit. You are correct or try the following way:
    push your Adam's apple back as you pronouncing "H".You almost get it right.
    Thank you
    حبيبي
    love : حبيب
    my:ي
    In English , my love
    In Arabic, love my
     

    JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    ^Hebrew borrowed Habibi from Arabic as חַבִּיבִּי meaning my friend, buddy, man. and חָבִיב(Haviv) is also a Hebrew adjective meaning pleasant or friendly, and noun meaning darling.
     

    Ali Al-Majnooni

    New Member
    Saudi Arabia / Arabic
    Hi all,

    Whodunit, Ayed means the هـ sound, the sound that exists in English. Many speakers of languages that don't have the ح sound of Arabic pronounce it as if it is /h/. This can be traced to the fact that both sounds have the same place of articulation.
    Habibi is said to male receivers. For female receivers, Habibti or Habibeti should be used. One more point: Not always is that word used to express love. You can say it while speaking to everyone to show friendliness.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Ah well. Is the female ending ـتي? I've always thought that the 1st singular in English 'my' is invariable in Arabic, i.e. no difference between male and female. Ah, now I got you: You mean حبيتة is the female form and the ة gets an extra pronounced -t, so "habibti" is in written Arabic: حبيبتي, isn't it?
     

    Ali Al-Majnooni

    New Member
    Saudi Arabia / Arabic
    Exactly, whodunit.

    There is a difference between male and female adjectives and nouns. This is simply why Habibi is different from Habibti.

    Look, I will provide an example:

    Katib is the Arabic word for writer ( male )
    Katibeh is the Arabic word for writer ( female )

    By the same token, Habib means ( beloved male )
    Similarly, Habibeh means ( beloved female )

    So, when trying to say [ my writer ] you can use Katibi for males, and Katibti or Katibeti for females. the same thing applies to Habibi and Habibti.

    Now, can you do this exercise:
    Knowing that Khadim means a male server and Kadimeh means a female server or maid, Give the equivalent Arabic expressions for these phrases:
    1. my server
    2. my maid

    Good Luck.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    To sum up, here are some possible meanings of the word (this is by no means an exhaustive list):

    -lover, beloved one, darling, sweetheart, sweetie, honey (said to a lover)
    -sweetheart, sweetie (said to a child)
    -buddy, pal, man, friend, mate (said to a friend)
    -"habibi" is said to little kids by strangers to soften a request (for examples, "ta'al hon, habibi" ["come here, sweetie])
    -"ya habibi" can mean "Oh my!" as an expression of amazement, frustration, disapproval, etc.
    -"habibi!!" in a plaintive, whiney tone can mean "pleeeeeeeeeease? pretty please with a cherry on top??"

    Of course, as was mentioned, the female version is "habibti," the plural "habaybi" or "habibati" (at least in Palestinian Arabic). Also bear in mind that the interjection "ya habibi!" I mentioned works only in the singular male form.

    These are all, of course, Palestinian Arabic versions. I don't know how many of them are the same in other dialects (that would be too much for me to try to figure out! :D )

    And yes, Hebrew has borrowed many slang (and vulgar!) expressions from Palestinian Arabic. "Habibi" is one of many. ;)
     

    steph_oc

    New Member
    USA English
    My boyfriend is lebanese and calls me Habibi. It means darling. It can be used amongst friends also. Men to men, men to women, women to women. its a sweet way of calling some one you care about.
     

    ^MB^

    Member
    :D :D :D

    nice replies :D


    Habibi

    Habib حبيب = lover, darling

    i = my

    Habibi = my darling = حبيبى

    u can say it in many situations

    when u meet ur darling, closed friend, baby, ur father, husband, ..........etc
     

    FruitTingle

    New Member
    australian
    FYI

    "Habibi" means "my darling or my sweetheart" but it is used when you would call a male by that, if you were talking to a woman then you would say "Habibti"
     

    Xerinola

    Senior Member
    Català/Español, Barcelona (SPAIN)
    I'm arabic translator, HABIBI is sweety, darling, honey...
    En Español: cariño

    Saludos from Barcelona!
     

    belano75

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    cuchuflete said:
    Hi Rob,

    Years ago I studied some medieval Spanish/Arabic love poetry. The word was used frequently in those poems. I was taught that it meant "beloved one" in the Arabic of the time. Here is a modern translation of a popular song. It seems that the meaning has endured for hundreds of years.

    http://www.shira.net/nourelain.htm

    cheers,
    Cuchu
    I remember this word from a poem. It is a kharja (jarcha), a kind of lyrical poem written in Mozarabic. It was a Romance language strongly influenced by Arab and Hebrew, spoken in some areas of the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Age. It has been very surpring for me to discover that Arabs are still using this word.

    Those poems were originally written with Arab letters. This is a transcription in Latin letters for this one (this word is also appearing in many others):

    "Tan t'amaray tan t'amaray
    habib, tan t'amaray
    Enfermeron welyos cuidas
    ya dolen tan male"

    It is supposed to be one the oldest poems keept by us in a Romance language.
     

    habibi&habiba

    New Member
    india
    Dear Friends

    Thank you for giving me an opportunity to share my views through this forum. I am currently at Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and being an outsider I can identify with the usage of the word Habibi. Almost every Arabic love song has the word Habibi in it.

    Further, Habibi is also used when guys get irritated with you and try to explain a point to you. For example: Habibi ... the computer software doesnt work this way etc ...

    Of course, I myself use the word Habibi to address my girl friend and she thinks its very cute and calls me habiba in return. ;)

    Habiba
     

    smooha

    Member
    Hebrew/English/USA
    I don't know if this thread is still active, but worth a shot:

    Can someone explain to me the use of 7abib/7abibti use in romantic situations? I've heard that, at least in Egyptian usage, masculine forms (e.g. 7abib) are used by men to a dress women in a flirtatious way, kind of like what habibi&habiba mentioned.

    Also, corrolary question: is anybody out there familiar with usage among the queer Arab sub-culture? I know that in Israel, for example, many gay men jokingly (and often not jokingly as well) use the feminine forms with each other.

    Thanks--
    N
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Can someone explain to me the use of 7abib/7abibti use in romantic situations? I've heard that, at least in Egyptian usage, masculine forms (e.g. 7abib) are used by men to a dress women in a flirtatious way, kind of like what habibi&habiba mentioned.
    Yes, this is common, but always with the possessive pronoun. That is, you could tell a girl "7abiibi" but not just "7abiib." Interestingly enough, this does not work the other way around: men are not addressed as "7abiibti" in romantic situations.
    Also, corrolary question: is anybody out there familiar with usage among the queer Arab sub-culture? I know that in Israel, for example, many gay men jokingly (and often not jokingly as well) use the feminine forms with each other.
    I do not know the answer to this question.
     

    smooha

    Member
    Hebrew/English/USA
    Yes, this is common, but always with the possessive pronoun. That is, you could tell a girl "7abiibi" but not just "7abiib." Interestingly enough, this does not work the other way around: men are not addressed as "7abiibti" in romantic situations.
    I do not know the answer to this question.
    Would this apply to just the word 7abiibi or would this masculinization apply to conjugated verbs as well?

    As for the second comment I made about gender reversal, I was referring to Israeli Hebrew, not Palestinian Arabic. My apologies if this was unclear; and I wouldn't expect anyone who is not a part of the (mostly underground) Arab gay subculture to know the answer..
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Would this apply to just the word 7abiibi or would this masculinization apply to conjugated verbs as well?
    It would apply to conjugated verbs as well.
    As for the second comment I made about gender reversal, I was referring to Israeli Hebrew, not Palestinian Arabic. My apologies if this was unclear; and I wouldn't expect anyone who is not a part of the (mostly underground) Arab gay subculture to know the answer..
    Questions about Israeli Hebrew are beyond the scope of the Arabic forum. :)
     

    smooha

    Member
    Hebrew/English/USA
    It would apply to conjugated verbs as well.
    Questions about Israeli Hebrew are beyond the scope of the Arabic forum. :)
    The question wasn't about Israeli Hebrew. I was just referencing the gender reversal among gay men in Israel, a) because Hebrew and [at least Palestinian] Arabic have some overlap and b) so that you wouldn't all think I just descended from the moon for suggesting this phenomenon might exist in Arabic ;).
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    That was clear from the beginning. :) I said I did not know the answer to your question about the usage in Arabic because I am not familiar with that sub-culture.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Habibi means husband in Arabic
    Welcome to the forums. :)

    I'm sorry to disagree with your very first post but "habibi" does not mean "husband" in Arabic. If you want to know what it means, please read through this thread. :)
     

    nena005

    New Member
    U.S.A. native language is Spanish and English
    Well sorry for that then I was told in the past that it was husband.
     

    javed5395

    New Member
    India, Urdu
    Hi all, I have become a proud father of a baby girl. I want to name her Habiba. ? Should it be Habiba or Habibeh?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Hi, Javed. Welcome to the forums and congratulations on the birth of your daughter. :)

    "Habiba" is the MSA (standard Arabic) form, while "habibeh" is the Levantine pronunciation.

    I'd say pick whichever one sounds better to you. :)
     

    Heddy77

    New Member
    USA
    I have a friend in Amman, Jordan and he said that Habibi means love or darling. I've also heard it used just as a general term of endearment.
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    ^^ correct. You love your husband, you call him habibi, you love your son/brother/friend/uncle/cat...etc. so you call him habibi. It simply means "my love" and the love can be of any kind.
     

    doctordrei

    New Member
    English
    this topic was used long time ago .. but if i write an answer .. maybe it's up and alive again ? :)

    I was wondering, in one thread i've sean that Habib + i gets a possisive meaning, so habibti is also made of habibt+i and gets possesive meaning, or it's different case with female word?

    by the way. here was mentioned HABIBA several times ( in nick habiba&habibi) and about a man got a baby girl. Is it also a word, noun, adjective? Or it's just a female name?
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    Habibti is possessive of Habiba. In Standard Arabic it's pronounced Habibati but the second 'a' sound is often dropped in colloquial.

    Habiba is the feminine form of Habib (beloved one) so the baby girl's name is "the beloved one". By adding the i (letter yaa') it means "my beloved one". Whether it's an adjective or not depends on it's location in the sentence and an adjective is a noun so I'd say yes, the word is a noun .
     

    kteach618

    New Member
    english
    Hi... Okay I may have a slight dilemma on my hands. My boyfriend drew out a tattoo that I have been wanting for 6 months. I had a friend draw it also and it looked the same. The tattoo says Habibti written in natural form. However, my friend says it is missing dots, and my boyfriend swears it's right. Can there be different ways to write it? I got it already and now I'm nervous that it says nothing. Or something else.

    It has two at the top, two at the bottom, and two under the last sound (the big curve - i can't find it on my arabic keyboard thing). AHHHH! Help!
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Welcome to the forum.

    It should look like this: حبيبتي

    So 2 on top and a total of 6 on the bottom.
     

    kteach618

    New Member
    english
    Ok, so my next question is... I talked to him last night and told him to think hard because I can have the other two dots put on but I can't take them off. He said that in casual conversation, the vowel sounds are mostly left out. He said that only in professional writing/speaking do you add the vowel sounds so mine is the casual... And he is Lebanese, does that make a difference?

    I believe you! It's just that if I get these two put on, I cant take them off and he swears it's right. :)

    THANK YOU SO MUCH!
    I have a picture of what he wrote (that I took to the tattoo shop), but I can't put it here because I haven't posted at least 30 posts. If it would help to see it, and see if you can read it, we can figure something out. Just let me know.
     
    Last edited:

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    He is right about vowels, but the dots in this word are not vowels. They are absolutely indispensable. And it doesn't make a difference where you're from.

    You can send me the link to the picture by PM, and I can post it for you.
     

    kteach618

    New Member
    english
    ok that's why then. he always writes it the first way. so if i put in the two dots, will it be right?

    it looks like that's all i'm missing if I compare the one you posted to the one he wrote
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Generally, it gets written "habibti" in English regardless of pronunciation. The original is in Arabic, and we don't use English transliterations as a guide to Arabic spelling. :)

    Not only do you need two additional dots; you need another "well" to put the two dots under.

    حببتي (wrong) vs. حبيبتي (right)
     
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