hable con ella

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  • lazarus1907

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    Such as it is, the verb is in imperative or subjunctive, and it is polite:
    (Please) talk to her.
    If you use a stress mark (hablé) it would be:
    I spoke to her.
     

    Tape2Tape

    Senior Member
    British English, Spain
    In British English I'd (personally) say "Talk to her"
    In American English you could say "Talk with her"

    But the Álmodovar film was "Talk to Her".
     

    mariposita

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I wouldn't say talk with her--I would say talk to her. It sounds really colloquial to me, but not in a good way... I would, however, say speak with her.
     

    jivemu

    Senior Member
    Spain / Spanish
    mariposita said:
    I wouldn't say talk with her--I would say talk to her. It sounds really colloquial to me, but not in a good way... I would, however, say speak with her.
    I think you haven't seen the film. So you don't know that she (the female who the title refers to) can't talk. "speak/talk with" doesn't make sense in this context. Here, '(please) talk to her' is the best translation for 'hable (usted) con ella'.

    Bye!
     

    mariposita

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Yes, I have seen the film (many times). I was referring more generally to the expression to talk to vs. to talk with. The original poster never said that he/she was looking for a translation of the title of the Almodóvar film.

    And tapetotape mentioned that American English speakers might say talk with her. I wouldn't--in any context. I'm not sure exactly why, but it just doesn't sound right.
     
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