hacerse - Se hizo la tonta/sorda

Gamen

Banned
Spanish Argentina
¿Cómo puedo traducir al inglés?

Se hizo la tonta / la sorda

Mi intento
She acted as a fool/ as a deaf.
She played as a fool/ as a deaf.

¿Están de acuerdo?
 
  • KirkandRafer

    Senior Member
    Español (Murcia, España)
    She played / acted dumb.

    She turned a deaf ear.

    Esperemos a que los nativos corrijan o confirmen.
     

    Gamen

    Banned
    Spanish Argentina
    Maybe I should have used "like" instead of "as" in my examples:
    She acted like a fool/ like a deaf.
    She played like a fool/ like a deaf.

    Does it sound better now?
     

    Doncar

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    Bueno, tal vez sea el único que ve la diferencia entre hacerse el tonto y "actuar como un tonto" uno puede actuar como un tonto con un grupo de amigos. Eso es to act dumb. Pero "hacerse el tonto" es pretender no entender algo mientras sí se entiende. Y eso es to pretend being dumb.

    Parece lo mismo pero creo que hay una sutíl diferencia tanto en español cómo en inglés.
     

    gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    Bueno, tal vez sea el único que ve la diferencia entre hacerse el tonto y "actuar como un tonto" uno puede actuar como un tonto con un grupo de amigos. Eso es to act dumb. Pero "hacerse el tonto" es pretender no entender algo mientras sí se entiende. Y eso es to pretend being dumb.

    Parece lo mismo pero creo que hay una sutíl diferencia tanto en español cómo en inglés.
    Actuar como un tonto = to act dumb/silly/ like a fool.
    Hacerse el tonto = to play dumb, to turn a deaf ear (fingir no entender u oir).
    I think "to act dumb" could be understood either way, depending on the context. But act silly, like a fool, or other similar adjectives would mean actuar como un tonto. He played/acted the fool, would also mean "actuó como un tonto."

    Pretend being dumb does not sound natural to me.
     

    Gamen

    Banned
    Spanish Argentina
    Ok, the contructions are different depending on the "adjective" you choose as I could see.

    I say: He acted dumb/ he acted silly, but he acted like a fool.
    He played dumb/ he played silly, but, he played like a fool.

    1) Just with the adjective "fool" I have to add the link word "like" + article (a). With the other adjectives, you put nothing between the verb and the adjective. Is that so as a rule?

    2) Can I replace "like" by "as" in the expression: "to act/play like a fool"?
     
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    gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    1) The reason you have to say "like a" before fool, is that fool is a noun, not an adjective. If you use a noun, such as idiot, clown, jerk, etc., you have to use "like a." For that same reason you can't say he acted like a deaf, because deaf is an adjective, not a noun. You can say he acted like a deaf person or he acted deaf.

    Act + adjective
    Act like a + noun


    2) Like is used for a comparison, typically of things. It’s often used when comparing nouns or comparing something to a noun. The noun follows like in the sentence…
    Little Katie looks just like her momma.
    The skin on his palms felt like the finest grain sandpaper.
    Dorothy laughed like a hyena.
    The prisoner ate like a pig.
    Use as when you’re not comparing something to a noun. Verbs, rather than nouns, typically follow the use of as. (see here for more explanation)

    So, no, you cannot replace "like" by "as" in the expression "to act like a fool."

    "Play like a fool" does not sound natural to me in this context. If you mean he acts foolish, I would say "he acts like a fool" or "he plays the fool." If you want to say he wanted to ignore someone by acting as if he didn't hear him, the idiomatic expressions are "He played dumb" or "He turned a deaf ear," as KirkandRafer said above.
     
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