"had a taxi waiting" vs "had a taxi wait"

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huynhvantinhftu

Senior Member
Vietnamese
I wonder what is the difference between these two sentence.
(1) The hotel had a taxi waiting to collect us.
(2) The hotel had a taxi wait to collect us.

I hope to receive your advice.
Many thanks for your time and helping.
 
  • tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    (1) There was a taxi waiting to collect us at the hotel. The hotel (staff) had arranged this.
    (2) The hotel (staff) arranged for a taxi to wait to collect us.

    There is no significant difference in meaning. The first places more emphasis on the presence of the waiting taxi, the second on the act of the hotel (staff).
     

    huynhvantinhftu

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    (1) There was a taxi waiting to collect us at the hotel. The hotel (staff) had arranged this.
    (2) The hotel (staff) arranged for a taxi to wait to collect us.

    There is no significant difference in meaning. The first places more emphasis on the presence of the waiting taxi, the second on the act of the hotel (staff).
    I thank you so much, tunaafi
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    The second have in your sentence is a kind of causative have. As tunaafi said, it means that the hotel had arranged for the taxi to be available. It does not imply that the taxi was already present. It just emphasises that the arrangement has been been made. For this construction, the second verb is in the infinitive or in the past participial form (for a passive construction).

    I had the plumber look at the tap.
    I had the tap looked at.

    The first have just means that something was present. You could say, 'There was a taxi waiting for us at the hotel.'
     
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