"had about" vs. "have about" - Eng>Port

Márcio Osório

Senior Member
Brazil, Brazilian Portuguese
1. O que significa o "had about" em (a)?
2. De que outra forma escreveríamos (a)?
3. Sem mais nenhum contexto, inventei (b) e (c). Se certas, quero um doce; se erradas, um puxão de orelha. De qualquer forma, em que (b) difere de (c)?

(a) "Thank God they found you. Your parents had about given up hope of ever seeing you again"
(b) "Your rescuers have all about given up trying"
(c) "Your rescuers had all about given up trying"

Comments & replies in any of the languages specified by the the board admin accepted (or should I say "... acceptable"?)

Thank you.
 
  • Vanda

    Moderesa de Beagá
    Português/ Brasil
    Ai ai ai, nosso calcanhar de Aquiles, verbos frasais:

    a) "Thank God they found you. Your parents had about given up hope of ever seeing you again"
    Pelo contexto, eu traduziria: ........tinham perdido a esperança de ver vc de novo.
    (b) "Your rescuers have all about given up trying"
    .......desistiram de vez de tentar (procurar)
    (c) "Your rescuers had all about given up trying"
    ....... tinham desistido de vez de tentar (procurar)

    - suspiro ----
     

    Canela_am

    Member
    the Netherlands, Dutch
    (a) "Thank God they found you. Your parents had about given up hope of ever seeing you again"

    i am no expert on english, so i leave B and C to be answered by someone else, but i think i can explain (a).
    "About" in this sentence, can be replaced by "almost", which makes the sentence perhaps more clear.

    Your parents had almost given up hope of ever seeing you again"
     

    Canela_am

    Member
    the Netherlands, Dutch
    now, as i am thinking about b and c...
    Sentence B sounds strange to me, because it is directed at the person to be rescued, BEFORE being rescued.

    Your rescuers have all about given up trying.
    You say this to the "victim". But because of the time the sentence is in, it is clear that the victim isn´t resqued yet!
    So... who would use a sentence like that? An evil person, who himself doesn’t need rescuing, but nevertheless, is keeping a poor helpless victim from being rescued? It could be. ( or i´ve seen too many movies )


    Now, for sentence C, things are much clearer. The victim has been rescued, and is now listening to how much lucky he was (the almost or “about” word) that the rescuers hadn’t given up trying to rescue him!
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    De acordo com Canela. :thumbsup:

    Márcio Osório said:
    (a) "Thank God they found you. Your parents had about given up hope of ever seeing you again"
    "Os seus pais (já) quase tinham desistido de voltar a vê-lo" ou "Os seus pais (já) estavam prestes a desistir de voltar a vê-lo."

    Márcio Osório said:
    (b) "Your rescuers have all about given up trying"
    (c) "Your rescuers had all about given up trying"
    (b) "Os seus salvadores/socorristas praticamente já desistiram de tentar" (ou "estão quase a desistir de tentar", etc.)
    (c) "Os seus salvadores/socorristas praticamente já tinham desistido de tentar."
     

    Johannes

    Senior Member
    Dutch Netherlands
    Your rescuers have all about given up trying.
    You say this to the "victim". But because of the time the sentence is in, it is clear that the victim isn´t resqued yet!

    Well, you could be rescued from bankruptcy, in which case you can talk to the 'victim' before.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top