...had glassed his son.

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audiolaik

Senior Member
Polish
Hello,

What does the phrase in bold stand for?

"A policeman has been jailed for a year for beating a man he wrongly thought had glassed his son." (source)
Would I be right to say that it means to hit/attack somebody?

Thank you!
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    It's not a term used in AE, but part of the source you cite suggests that it means to attack with a piee of sharp glass.

    "
    Harrop, who caused a permanent scar to the officer's son's face, was given a community order after admitting the assault earlier this month, the court heard."



    Oxford ALD confirms:



    verb [vn] (BrE, informal) to hit sb in the face with a glass
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I'm probably the oddity here, but the only meaning I've heard of for "glassing" is to observe with binoculars or telescopes, e.g. the hunters glassed the opposite slopes in hopes of seeing a deer.
     

    audiolaik

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'm probably the oddity here, but the only meaning I've heard of for "glassing" is to observe with binoculars or telescopes, e.g. the hunters glassed the opposite slopes in hopes of seeing a deer.
    No, you are not; I looked the word up, but I could not find the definition the other forum users provided.:eek:
     
    Last edited:

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I always thought glassing referred to the practice of smashing the top off a pint glass (or beer bottle) and using the jagged edge as a weapon.
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    I always thought glassing referred to the practice of smashing the top off a pint glass (or beer bottle) and using the jagged edge as a weapon.

    That's exactly the way I understand it too!. It's a very vicious attack with horrendous results.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I always thought glassing referred to the practice of smashing the top off a pint glass (or beer bottle) and using the jagged edge as a weapon.
    Another ticky-tick.
    It is beginning to look as if this usage is widespread in the UK and unknown elsewhere.

    From the OED:
    slang (orig. and chiefly Brit.). To strike (a person) with a (broken) glass or bottle, esp. in the face.
    First used in writing in 1931.
     
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