hail fra th' Pole

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mariana79

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello
I am reading D.H.Lawrence`s Rainbow, there is a woman whom Brangwen will finally marry, she`s a pole, describing her, Lawrence says she hail fra th' Pole. does it mean she greets people in her mother tongue, I wonder?
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    This is very odd! Is it Lawrence talking (as narrator) or one of his characters? Because she hail fra th' Pole seems to be some kind of Scottish accent - why would that be? And of course, the (north or south) Pole and Poland aren't the same.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    This is very odd! Is it Lawrence talking (as narrator) or one of his characters? Because she hail fra th' Pole seems to be some kind of Scottish accent - why would that be? And of course, the (north or south) Pole and Poland aren't the same.
    The characters are discussing Lydia who is Polish.
    "She's fra some foreign parts or other."
    ...
    "I don't know. They do say as she hails fra th' Pole. I don't know," Tilly hastened to add, knowing he would attack her.

    "Fra th' Pole, why do you hail fra th' Pole? Who set up that menagerie confabulation?"
    ...
    "Mrs. Bentley says as she's fra th' Pole--else she is a Pole, or summat."
    (... lines omitted to meet four line quote restriction)
    The characters seem to be a bit confused themselves. ;)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Possibly, back in 1915, it was acceptable to use "the Pole" to mean Poland?

    Or possibly the fair lass was a penguin...
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Lawrence does not say this. Bragwen says it in a conversation with the maid, Tilly, who is not very clever. Bragwen asks Tilley about a woman:
    "I don't know. They do say as she hails fra th' Pole. I don't know," Tilly hastened to add, knowing he would attack her.
    "Fra th' Pole, why do you hail fra th' Pole? Who set up that menagerie confabulation?"
    "That's what they say—I don't know——"
    "Who says?"
    "Mrs. Bentley says as she's fra th' Pole—else she is a Pole, or summat."
    Tilly is simply repeating what she has heard (or thought she heard) from Mrs Bentley but Tilly does not understand what was said.
    They do say as she hails fra th' Pole. = "They say that she comes from the Pole." -> here the Pole = the North Pole
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The point is that the speakers do not know that a Pole is a person from Poland. They misunderstand, and think Lydia comes from the North Pole. (Or, if she is a penguin, from the South Pole, but that is less likely when the people in the discussion live at about 50° north latitude.)
     
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