half a mile uphill from Pan Toll Ranger Station. || not-so-spiritual

ilikerunning

New Member
Chinese
Topic sentence: So we began half a mile uphill from Pan Toll Ranger Station.
Copied from title by Cagey, moderator

text source: Essay | Circumambulating Mt. Tam in COVID Times - Bay Nature

The sentence appears in the 11th paragraph. I don't quite understand the sentence. Does it mean that they parked their car half a mile away down from Pan Toll Ranger Station on the slopy road, so that they need to walk more miles uphill than people normally does starting from PTRS? Or does it mean that they parked thier car half a mile higher up from PTRS? Either way may lead to them feeling "not so spiritual" in the later sentence.

Many thanks!
 
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  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    What exactly are you asking about? Do you mean the sentence that you’ve used as your thread title but not included in your post? If so, what has that got to do with parking a car?
     

    ilikerunning

    New Member
    Chinese
    sorry, the thread title is the sentence I am ask about. As for car parking, please go a little further to the source text. Sorry for the trouble.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    It's important to read it with the sentence that follows:
    "So we began half a mile uphill from Pan Toll Ranger Station (see: impacted parking, above). We piled out of the car on the not-so-spiritual side of the road."

    It sounds to me as though they went uphill from the Pan Toll Ranger Station in the car for half a mile and then parked and got out of the car. If they had gotten out of the car and then walked past the ranger station, she would not have written those two sentences in that order. They couldn't park near the ranger station because there were no spaces. As she says later, people were still driving past her looking for places to park.

    I don't see much significance in "the not-so-spiritual side of the road." She uses the phrase because at the moment she is not doing anything 'spiritual.' She's getting out of the car and getting ready for the actual pilgrimage: driving to Mt. Tamalpais, going past the ranger station, and parking are not part of the spiritual pilgrimage.

    If you want to know for sure what she means, you might ask the author. There is a link to her website at the end of the essay, and on her website there is a way to contact her.

    If you haven't looked at a map of Mt. Tamalpais, you might find it useful. The places she mentions are marked on a map I looked at just now.

    Bear in mind that Mt. Tamalpais is a prominent landmark and hiking destination, adjacent to the city of San Francisco and in a fairly densely populated part of California. Lots of people in SF were probably out on New Year's Day 2021 looking for a way to celebrate the new year safely, outside. I expect that's why she mentions the parking: this is an essay in a local San Francisco Bay Area online publication, so her audience is familiar with the area and how people found things to do outside during the pandemic.
     

    Azure1127

    New Member
    Mandarin
    It's important to read it with the sentence that follows:
    "So we began half a mile uphill from Pan Toll Ranger Station (see: impacted parking, above). We piled out of the car on the not-so-spiritual side of the road."

    It sounds to me as though they went uphill from the Pan Toll Ranger Station in the car for half a mile and then parked and got out of the car. If they had gotten out of the car and then walked past the ranger station, she would not have written those two sentences in that order. They couldn't park near the ranger station because there were no spaces. As she says later, people were still driving past her looking for places to park.

    I don't see much significance in "the not-so-spiritual side of the road." She uses the phrase because at the moment she is not doing anything 'spiritual.' She's getting out of the car and getting ready for the actual pilgrimage: driving to Mt. Tamalpais, going past the ranger station, and parking are not part of the spiritual pilgrimage.

    If you want to know for sure what she means, you might ask the author. There is a link to her website at the end of the essay, and on her website there is a way to contact her.

    If you haven't looked at a map of Mt. Tamalpais, you might find it useful. The places she mentions are marked on a map I looked at just now.

    Bear in mind that Mt. Tamalpais is a prominent landmark and hiking destination, adjacent to the city of San Francisco and in a fairly densely populated part of California. Lots of people in SF were probably out on New Year's Day 2021 looking for a way to celebrate the new year safely, outside. I expect that's why she mentions the parking: this is an essay in a local San Francisco Bay Area online publication, so her audience is familiar with the area and how people found things to do outside during the pandemic.
    Wow… your explanation is so excellent and really helps me so much!
     
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    TerioFanning

    New Member
    Chinese
    It's important to read it with the sentence that follows:
    "So we began half a mile uphill from Pan Toll Ranger Station (see: impacted parking, above). We piled out of the car on the not-so-spiritual side of the road."

    It sounds to me as though they went uphill from the Pan Toll Ranger Station in the car for half a mile and then parked and got out of the car. If they had gotten out of the car and then walked past the ranger station, she would not have written those two sentences in that order. They couldn't park near the ranger station because there were no spaces. As she says later, people were still driving past her looking for places to park.

    I don't see much significance in "the not-so-spiritual side of the road." She uses the phrase because at the moment she is not doing anything 'spiritual.' She's getting out of the car and getting ready for the actual pilgrimage: driving to Mt. Tamalpais, going past the ranger station, and parking are not part of the spiritual pilgrimage.

    If you want to know for sure what she means, you might ask the author. There is a link to her website at the end of the essay, and on her website there is a way to contact her.

    If you haven't looked at a map of Mt. Tamalpais, you might find it useful. The places she mentions are marked on a map I looked at just now.

    Bear in mind that Mt. Tamalpais is a prominent landmark and hiking destination, adjacent to the city of San Francisco and in a fairly densely populated part of California. Lots of people in SF were probably out on New Year's Day 2021 looking for a way to celebrate the new year safely, outside. I expect that's why she mentions the parking: this is an essay in a local San Francisco Bay Area online publication, so her audience is familiar with the area and how people found things to do outside during the pandemic.
    Thanks a lot!!
     

    Adgar

    New Member
    Chinese
    Thanks for your excellent explanation!!!
    It's important to read it with the sentence that follows:
    "So we began half a mile uphill from Pan Toll Ranger Station (see: impacted parking, above). We piled out of the car on the not-so-spiritual side of the road."

    It sounds to me as though they went uphill from the Pan Toll Ranger Station in the car for half a mile and then parked and got out of the car. If they had gotten out of the car and then walked past the ranger station, she would not have written those two sentences in that order. They couldn't park near the ranger station because there were no spaces. As she says later, people were still driving past her looking for places to park.

    I don't see much significance in "the not-so-spiritual side of the road." She uses the phrase because at the moment she is not doing anything 'spiritual.' She's getting out of the car and getting ready for the actual pilgrimage: driving to Mt. Tamalpais, going past the ranger station, and parking are not part of the spiritual pilgrimage.

    If you want to know for sure what she means, you might ask the author. There is a link to her website at the end of the essay, and on her website there is a way to contact her.

    If you haven't looked at a map of Mt. Tamalpais, you might find it useful. The places she mentions are marked on a map I looked at just now.

    Bear in mind that Mt. Tamalpais is a prominent landmark and hiking destination, adjacent to the city of San Francisco and in a fairly densely populated part of California. Lots of people in SF were probably out on New Year's Day 2021 looking for a way to celebrate the new year safely, outside. I expect that's why she mentions the parking: this is an essay in a local San Francisco Bay Area online publication, so her audience is familiar with the area and how people found things to do outside during the pandemic.
     

    Jacqueline Chou

    New Member
    Chinese
    It's important to read it with the sentence that follows:
    "So we began half a mile uphill from Pan Toll Ranger Station (see: impacted parking, above). We piled out of the car on the not-so-spiritual side of the road."

    It sounds to me as though they went uphill from the Pan Toll Ranger Station in the car for half a mile and then parked and got out of the car. If they had gotten out of the car and then walked past the ranger station, she would not have written those two sentences in that order. They couldn't park near the ranger station because there were no spaces. As she says later, people were still driving past her looking for places to park.

    I don't see much significance in "the not-so-spiritual side of the road." She uses the phrase because at the moment she is not doing anything 'spiritual.' She's getting out of the car and getting ready for the actual pilgrimage: driving to Mt. Tamalpais, going past the ranger station, and parking are not part of the spiritual pilgrimage.

    If you want to know for sure what she means, you might ask the author. There is a link to her website at the end of the essay, and on her website there is a way to contact her.

    If you haven't looked at a map of Mt. Tamalpais, you might find it useful. The places she mentions are marked on a map I looked at just now.

    Bear in mind that Mt. Tamalpais is a prominent landmark and hiking destination, adjacent to the city of San Francisco and in a fairly densely populated part of California. Lots of people in SF were probably out on New Year's Day 2021 looking for a way to celebrate the new year safely, outside. I expect that's why she mentions the parking: this is an essay in a local San Francisco Bay Area online publication, so her audience is familiar with the area and how people found things to do outside during the pandemic.
    So, the Pan Toll Ranger Station here refers to a parking lot rather than an office which is responsible for managing and protecting an area of forest right? And, in the fifth paragraph from the bottom, the author mentioned "our consecrated roadside parking spot" whch seems aginst the meaning of "not-so-spiritual" above. It makes me really really confused...
     
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    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    The Pan Toll Ranger Station is a ranger station that is at a trailhead. It has a parking lot that's mentioned here. I think they were hoping to park in the parking lot at the ranger station because of her reference to the parking situation: "(see: impacted parking, above)".

    At the end of the essay she calls the parking spot consecrated because at the beginning of the hike, after they got out of the car on the not-so-spiritual side of the road, "I donned the regalia to pay respect to David and to Gary for their mentorship .... We chanted a spell, or Dharani, intended to remove disasters." That caused the spot to be consecrated.
     

    Jacqueline Chou

    New Member
    Chinese
    The Pan Toll Ranger Station is a ranger station that is at a trailhead. It has a parking lot that's mentioned here. I think they were hoping to park in the parking lot at the ranger station because of her reference to the parking situation: "(see: impacted parking, above)".

    At the end of the essay she calls the parking spot consecrated because at the beginning of the hike, after they got out of the car on the not-so-spiritual side of the road, "I donned the regalia to pay respect to David and to Gary for their mentorship .... We chanted a spell, or Dharani, intended to remove disasters." That caused the spot to be consecrated.
    Wow I got it! How brilliant you are! I think I know how to translate it. Thanks for your help!😊
     

    Estela Li

    New Member
    Mandarin
    It's important to read it with the sentence that follows:
    "So we began half a mile uphill from Pan Toll Ranger Station (see: impacted parking, above). We piled out of the car on the not-so-spiritual side of the road."

    It sounds to me as though they went uphill from the Pan Toll Ranger Station in the car for half a mile and then parked and got out of the car. If they had gotten out of the car and then walked past the ranger station, she would not have written those two sentences in that order. They couldn't park near the ranger station because there were no spaces. As she says later, people were still driving past her looking for places to park.

    I don't see much significance in "the not-so-spiritual side of the road." She uses the phrase because at the moment she is not doing anything 'spiritual.' She's getting out of the car and getting ready for the actual pilgrimage: driving to Mt. Tamalpais, going past the ranger station, and parking are not part of the spiritual pilgrimage.

    If you want to know for sure what she means, you might ask the author. There is a link to her website at the end of the essay, and on her website there is a way to contact her.

    If you haven't looked at a map of Mt. Tamalpais, you might find it useful. The places she mentions are marked on a map I looked at just now.

    Bear in mind that Mt. Tamalpais is a prominent landmark and hiking destination, adjacent to the city of San Francisco and in a fairly densely populated part of California. Lots of people in SF were probably out on New Year's Day 2021 looking for a way to celebrate the new year safely, outside. I expect that's why she mentions the parking: this is an essay in a local San Francisco Bay Area online publication, so her audience is familiar with the area and how people found things to do outside during the pandemic.
    Thanks a million!! But I'm still a little confused with the meaning of "the not-so-spiritual side". We know that, generally speaking, a road has two sides... so the opposite side of the "not-so-spiritual side" will be the spiritual side... what does "spiritual" here refer to?😭 In your reply, I got it that the road was a not so spiritual part of the whole journey, but it seems to me that maybe it is talks about the two sides of a whole road? I'm not sure whether I have a misunderstanding😭
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It's the (not so spiritual) (side of the road). "The side of the road" is where you park your car if there's no where else to park. It doesn't matter which side.
     

    Estela Li

    New Member
    Mandarin
    It's the (not so spiritual) (side of the road). "The side of the road" is where you park your car if there's no where else to park. It doesn't matter which side.
    AHHHHHHHH lol with this understanding, my question seems to be stupid hhhh, okkkk thx a lot for your explication!!😋
     
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