Halloween is a contraction of All Hallow Even/Eve?

AntiScam

Senior Member
Arabic
Hi,

Oxford's Advanced Learner's Dictionary says:
[Halloween] late 18th cent.: contraction of All Hallow Even

Is it really Even or is it a typo?
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Even is a variant of Eve or Evening; you might compare the name of the Anglican equivalent of the Catholic service of Vespers: Evensong. Note, however, that it is "All Hallows", not "All Hallow."
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Even is a variant of Eve or Evening; you might compare the name of the Anglican equivalent of the Catholic service of Vespers: Evensong. Note, however, that it is "All Hallows", not "All Hallow."
    Agreed. "Hallow" is an older synonym for "saint, holy person." So "Halloween" is the evening before All Saints' Day (November 1st).
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Is it really Even or is it a typo?
    Even was the noun for the end of the day (i.e. daylight.) Evening is a verbal noun meaning "the process becoming dusk; the sun setting." but is now seen as somewhere (very approximately) between 6pm and 9pm.

    Compare dawn and dawning.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Note, however, that it is "All Hallows", not "All Hallow."
    Not so. The OED is clear on the etymology - a contraction of "All-Hallow-Even" - in its entry for "Hallow-e'en". "All-Hallow-Even" is included in the OED entry for "All-Hallows", which also has "All-Hallow-Eve", "All Hallows' Eve", "All Hallows' Even" and "All Hallown Eve".
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Oxford's Advanced Learner's Dictionary says:
    [Halloween] late 18th cent.: contraction of All Hallow Even

    Is it really Even or is it a typo?
    Just to be clear: "Halloween" is not a contraction in modern English. It is a normal word.

    The dictionary say it was a contraction back in the last 1700s.
     
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