hand / arm

Alijsh

Senior Member
Persian - Iran
In English "arm" is technically the part of the superior limb between the shoulder and the elbow but commonly used to refer to the whole superior limb. In Persian, dast (hand) is used to refer to the whole limb: arm + forearm + hand

How about it in your language? Which one do you use to refer to the whole limb? And please write me both "hand" and "arm" in your language. Thanks.

Persian:
bâzu - arm
dast - hand
 
  • jonquiliser

    Senior Member
    Svediż tal-Finlandja
    Heh heh, for Swedish you already have them - hand and arm! :D They are used as in English; arm being the whole thing sticking out from your torso, up to the hand. And hand is the last bit with a few fingers :).

    In Finnish you can use both käsi and käsivarsi for arm; käsi is also the word for hand.
     

    OldAvatar

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Romanian:
    braţ = the part between the elbow and the shoulder, the arm (brats)
    antebraţ = the part between the elbow and the palm
    mână = hand
     

    OldAvatar

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    antebraţ + braţ + palmă (palm) = mână

    But in the spoken language, people use braţ for naming the whole member, even though that wouldn't be quite correct.
     

    su123

    Senior Member
    Catalonia/Catalan-Spanish
    Hello!

    Catalan:

    Braç: arm
    Avantbraç: forearm
    Mà: hand


    Castilian:

    Brazo: arm
    Antebrazo: forearm
    Mano: hand

    su123
     

    OldAvatar

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Do you pronounce Braç in Catalan as bras, bratch or bras? I know there are some words which are identical or very similar in both Catalan and Romanian, but I didn't know about this one.
     

    awanzi

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    In Italian is:

    arm: braccio
    forearm: avanbraccio
    hand: mano

    And braccio+avanbraccio+mano= braccio.

    (The only peculiarity is that the word "braccio" is male when singular but female when plural. We never say mano meaning the whole braccio.)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    In standard Arabic, يد (yad) is "hand" and ذراع (dhiraa`) is "arm," and the latter is used to refer to the whole limb.

    In Palestinian Arabic, we only have إيد (iid), which is used to refer to all three.
     

    papillon

    Senior Member
    Russian (Ukraine)
    In Russian, the word рука (ruka) is used to refer to the whole thing up to the shoulder. Other less common words can be used if we want to refer to a more specific part, for example: Кисть (kist') can be used for an arm (the part with fingers), but ruka would still be used in a normal speech.

    Incidentally, it's the same deal with foot/leg: нога (noga) means both.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    In standard Arabic, يد (yad) is "hand" and ذراع (dhiraa`) is "arm," and the latter is used to refer to the whole limb.
    There's also saa3id ساعد which is the part between the elbow and the hand.
    In Palestinian Arabic, we only have إيد (iid), which is used to refer to all three.
    In Egypt, we use iid for hand and deraa3 دراع for the arm and forearm.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In Portuguese:

    hand: mão
    between pulse and elbow: braço
    forearm: antebraço
    whole arm: braço
     

    Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    This topic and its parallel foot or leg were of special interest to me. Thank you all for contribution.

    ***
    There's also saa3id ساعد which is the part between the elbow and the hand.
    We also have sâed ساعد for forearm in Persian but it's pronounced differently: sâ.ed. We don't have ع sound of Arabic in Persian.
     

    Eáránë

    Member
    Belgium, Dutch (Flemish)
    Hello,

    In Dutch we use the same words only with a different pronunciation

    hand = hand
    arm = arm
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    There is "pazı" in Turkish coming from Persian 'bâzu', but its meaning has changed and now it means biceps. Also it can be used for arm.
    Turkish "pazu/bazu" is a direct loan from Persian, while "pazı" is not. The word comes from Armenian "pazug", which is also of Persian origin.
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Greek:

    Arm: (1) «Μπράτσο» [ˈbra.ʦ͡ɔ] (neut.), a boomerang word: Classical 3rd declension masc. noun «βραχίων» brăkʰíōn* (nom. sing.), «βραχίονος» brăkʰíŏnŏs (gen. sing.) > Lat. bracchium > Ven. brazzo > Byz. & MoGr «μπράτσο».
    (2) «Βραχίονας» [vraˈçi.ɔ.nas] (masc.) < Classical 3rd declension masc. noun «βραχίων» brăkʰíōn.
    (1) is colloquialism, both (1) & (2) are used interchangeably. In MoGr is used to refer to the upper arm + forearm.
    In Classical Greek, «βραχίων» was the upper arm only, the forearm was described by the 3rd declension masc. noun «πῆχυς» pêkʰŭs (nom. sing.), «πήχεος» pḗkʰĕŏs (gen. sing.). In MoGr «πήχυς» [ˈpi.çis] (masc.) is still the forearm, but it's bookish & rarely used.

    Hand: «Χέρι» [ˈçe.ɾi] (neut.) < Byz.Gr. neut. diminutive «χέρι(ο)ν» khéri(o)n, a simplification of the "difficult" Classical 3rd declension fem. noun «χείρ» kʰeí̯r (nom. sing.), «χειρός» kʰei̯rós (gen. sing.) --> hand, fist (PIE *ǵʰes-r- hand cf Hitt. keššar, hand, Tocharian A/B shar (idem), Arm. ձեռք (dzerrk), hand, Alb. dorë, hand).

    * According to some philologists, originally the comparative of the adj. «βραχύς» brăkʰús --> short (PIE *mr̥ǵʰú- short cf Skt. मुहुः (muhuḥ), again (adv.), Av. mərəzu- short, Proto-Germanic *murguz > Ger. murk, Eng. merry).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top