hane-maki-komi

darrenlooby

Member
England, English
There is a throw in Judo and Ju Jutsu named hane-maki-komi in Japanese.

'Springing winding throw' is the useul translation.

Can anyone help me better understand the Japanese etimology in play here?

I think I'm comfortable with 'hane', meaning spring(ing). But please feel free to correct me.

I get the impression that 'maki' means wrap(ing).

And that 'komi' means around. Or possibly pulling.
 
  • _forumuser_

    Senior Member
    Italian
    There is a throw in Judo and Ju Jutsu named hane-maki-komi in Japanese.

    'Springing winding throw' is the useul translation.

    Can anyone help me better understand the Japanese etimology in play here?

    I think I'm comfortable with 'hane', meaning spring(ing). But please feel free to correct me.

    I get the impression that 'maki' means wrap(ing).

    And that 'komi' means around. Or possibly pulling.

    Complete explanation with video demonstration here.

    Hane 跳 means 'jump' and the verb makikomu 巻き込む means to wrap oneself around something, to wrap something etc.
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    巻き込む means to wrap oneself around something, to wrap something etc.
    With the most general (and vague) interpretation, 巻き込む is "to wind something in (towards the centre of a motion)." Some of the uses are; 犯罪に巻き込む (implicate someone in a crime), スクリューに巻き込まれる (tangled into the screw), すだれを巻き込む (roll the screen in).
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I get the impression …

    … that 'komi' means around. Or possibly pulling.
    I too am approaching Japanese from the perspective of judo, and trying to not be too ignorant about it, so I've been trying to familiarise myself with hiragana and the specific kanji, but I basically don't know Japanese at all really.

    I see this word in various places (osae komi, maki komi, hikkomi, uchi komi, tsuri komi) but have no idea at all as to its function in any of these cases. The English glosses that I find for 込 are 'crowded', 'mixture', 'in bulk', 'included', but I can't see any relationship between those and the concepts in judo.

    Is it wrong-headed of me to be looking for a specific identifiable sense independent of context? Does 'komi' act more like a lesser element in these expressions? Apologies for my ignorance; I hope this isn't too much of a dumb question.
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Hello, tsoapm.

    You seem to be interested in the suffix -komi. Okay, it's the gerundive form of an archaic verb komu. The verb means "to stuff", "imbue" or so, transitively. It is seldom used independently in Modern Japanese (probably a rare thing in older varieties of the language, for that matter), but derives quite a lot of compound verbs. Your judo technique names are all gerundive forms of verbs derived this way:
    osaekomu (to supress completely) > osae komi,
    makikomu (to wrap in) > maki komi,
    hikikomu (to pull in, attract, implicate) > hikikomi, [I think hikkomi is a non-standard spelling, but if it is an established judo term, needless to say, I defer to that.]
    uchikomu (to throw or hit hard; intransitively, it means "get engrossed") > uchi komi,
    tsurikomu (to hang or tow towards the speaker) > tsuri komi
     
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