hang out, hanging out

suzzzenn

Senior Member
USA English
Hi,

I was wondering if any of you would be willing to help me with a project. I teach English at a middle school and recently got a new student from Germany who speaks about 200 words of English. The problem is that everyone else in the class has very advanced English skills and is almost ready to test out of the program. The new student is completely lost. For the most part I am basing the class around her needs and hoping the advanced kids don't mind the review. But I can't do this all the time. I would like to include her as much as possible in class activities but it is challenging. I was hoping to find someone who would be willing to translate instructions or information about what we are doing as a class so she is less left out. A little bit would go a long way. It wouldn't add up to more than a page or so of German a week. If you can help me please PM me! Or should I just post the stuff here? I know this is an unusual request!

Thanks!
Susan

Here is the first lesson:

We will be looking at photos of rooms of typical American teenagers and then listening to recordings of them talking about their interests. Can you guess which photo and recording goes with which room?

Vocabulary:

Lacrosse
softball
swimming
playing cards
cheerleading
hanging out/
hang out
playing manhunt (a game of hide-and-seek played at night)
playing darts
shopping
exploring
Greek
field hockey
ipod
play guitar
skateboard
messy
neat and organized
puppy
get along
argue
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Hi Susan,

    I have already seen many proofs of your immense dedication to your pupils, and I must say that it is a great pleasure to help such a passionate teacher. Please feel free to post whatever you want to have translated.

    :)

    Jana
     

    User1001

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi,

    I was wondering if any of you would be willing to help me with a project. I teach English at a middle school and recently got a new student from Germany who speaks about 200 words of English. The problem is that everyone else in the class has very advanced English skills and is almost ready to test out of the program. The new student is completely lost. For the most part I am basing the class around her needs and hoping the advanced kids don't mind the review. But I can't do this all the time. I would like to include her as much as possible in class activities but it is challenging. I was hoping to find someone who would be willing to translate instructions or information about what we are doing as a class so she is less left out. A little bit would go a long way. It wouldn't add up to more than a page or so of German a week. If you can help me please PM me! Or should I just post the stuff here? I know this is an unusual request!

    Thanks!
    Susan

    Here is the first lesson:

    We will be looking at photos of rooms of typical American teenagers and then listening to recordings of them talking about their interests. Can you guess which photo and recording goes with which room?

    Vocabulary:

    Lacrosse -> ???
    softball -> ???
    swimming -> das Schwimmen / der Schwimmensport
    playing cards -> das Kartenspiel
    cheerleading -> ???
    hanging out -> herumhängen
    hang out -> herumhängen
    playing manhunt (a game of hide-and-seek played at night) -> ???
    playing darts -> der Pfeil spielen
    shopping -> einkaufen
    exploring -> ausforschen
    Greek -> der Grieche (m) / die Griechin (f) / griechisch (adj)
    field hockey -> ???
    ipod -> iPod
    play guitar -> die Gitarre spielen
    skateboard -> das Skateboard
    messy -> unordentlich
    neat and organized -> sauber und organisiert
    puppy -> junger Hund
    get along -> vorankommen
    argue -> argumentieren

    There were a few I missed on there, and I'd recommend having a native German speaker look over them, because I make mistakes, but I wanted to give this a shot. Btw, have fun with the exchange student! ;)

    EDIT: Maybe "Hündchen" would be better?
    Bearbeiten: Vielleicht "Hündchen" wurde besser sein?
     

    suzzzenn

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Thank you Jana. And thanks Tspier!

    OK, lacrosse is a based on a Native American game in which you throw a ball using sticks with nets. There is probably no translation, so don't worry about that. Softball and field hockey must be international, no?

    I also need the instructions translated!

    Thanks
     

    User1001

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thank you Jana. And thanks Tspier!

    OK, lacrosse is a based on a Native American game in which you throw a ball using sticks with nets. There is probably no translation, so don't worry about that. Softball and field hockey must be international, no?

    I also need the instructions translated!

    Thanks

    Oh, sorry about that. I'll give it a shot, but my German isn't advanced enough for my mind to handle all the cases, so don't take it as "The Word". :)

    suzzzenn said:
    We will be looking at photos of rooms of typical American teenagers and then listening to recordings of them talking about their interests. Can you guess which photo and recording goes with which room?

    Vocabulary:

    tspier2 said:
    Wir werden an Bilder des jugendlich amerikanische Zimmern, und dann werden wir zu Tonaufnahmen anhören über ihre Interessen. Kannst du welchen Bild und Tonaufnahmen sind mit welche Zimmer meinen?

    Vokabeln:
     

    beclija

    Senior Member
    Boarisch, Österreich (Austria)
    We will be looking at photos of rooms of typical American teenagers and then listening to recordings of them talking about their interests. Can you guess which photo and recording goes with which room?

    Wir werden uns nun Fotos von den Zimmern typischer amerikanischer Jugendlicher ansehen und uns auf Kasette anhören, wie sie von ihren Interessen erzählen. Kannst du erraten, welches Bild und welche Erzählung zusammengehören?


    Vocabulary:

    Lacrosse -> ??? ???
    softball -> ??? Softball
    swimming -> das Schwimmen / der Schwimmensport
    playing cards -> das Kartenspiel (as a noun, like set of playing cards; v: Karten spielen.)
    cheerleading -> ???
    hanging out -> herumhängen/abhängen.
    hang out -> herumhängen
    playing manhunt (a game of hide-and-seek played at night) -> ???
    playing darts -> der Pfeil spielen Darts (or: Pfeile) schießen.
    shopping -> einkaufen
    exploring -> ausforschen erkund(ig)en, sich umschauen
    Greek -> der Grieche (m) / die Griechin (f) / griechisch (adj)
    field hockey -> ???
    ipod -> iPod
    play guitar -> die Gitarre spielen
    skateboard -> das Skateboard
    messy -> unordentlich
    neat and organized -> sauber und organisiert
    puppy -> junger Hund/Hündchen, both are ok.
    get along -> vorankommen/weiterkommen
    argue -> argumentieren (in the sense of having an argument/quarrel: streiten)
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    My suggestion for the instructions:

    Wir werden uns Bilder verschiedener Zimmer von typischen amerikanischen Jugendlichen ansehen und dann Tonaufnahmen anhören, in denen sie über ihre Interessen sprechen. Kannst du erraten, welches Bild und welche Aufnahme mit welchem Zimmer gehören?
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Susan,

    Lacrosse, as far as I know, is always "Lacrosse".

    For instance:

    Lacrosse ist der älteste Sport Nord Amerikas.
    Lacrosse is the oldest sport of Nother America (oldest North American sport).

    Field Hockey, field hocky. Hockey is hockey. The only difference is that German capitalizes all nouns. I know this is correct because I knew a student from Berlin who played "Field Hockey".

    Der Baseball, baseball, the same.
    Softball, softball

    Cheerleading is going to be difficult. We need a useful definition of "cheerleader" from someone German. I found a couple and neither were correct. I'm sure someone here will give us an excellent one, a description. I assume you are think about grades 6 or 7 through 12.

    Then you will have to explain to your student that "cheerleading" is what the "cheerleader does", the way a "swimmer" is involved in "swimming", a runner in "running", etc.

    You need to understand that there is no difference between "hanging out" and "hang" out in German, since there is no progressive tense. You use the basic forms "herumhängen/abhängen", but you make the difference between "hang out" and "hanging out" by other words. This is why you will hear from Germans who are not fluent in English.

    "I learn English in class each day." It means: "I AM LEARNING English in class each day." Be aware of that problem. With a 200 word vocabulary, you may have to wait awhile before explaining our progressive tenses.

    Same thing with your other "playing" examples:

    play manhunt/playing manhunt
    shop, shopping (verb)
    explore, exporing (I explore, I am exploring)
    play guitar, playing guitar -> die Gitarre spielen

    Hope this helps.

    Gaer

    EDIT: for "manhunt", you will need, I think, a phrase for "hide and seek" with the explanation that it is played at night. I never played it, so I have no idea what the rules are.
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    gaer said:
    ...
    In fact, I think that there is a 50/50 chance that "the cheerleaders" is going to turn out to be "die Cheerleader".
    I would add another 50 percent, which makes up 100 percent. In fact, it is "(die) Cheerleader" in German.
    ...
    The problem is how to turn the concept into a verb!
    I have no idea. At best I'd suggest to paraphrase it. Perhaps something like this will do:

    bei den Cheerleadern von (Miami Heat/ den Dresden Monarchs/ ...) sein
    or: in einer Cheerleadertruppe mitwirken

    Ralf
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    I would add another 50 percent, which makes up 100 percent. In fact, it is "(die) Cheerleader" in German.
    You know me. I'm always conservative about saying I am sure about something. ;)
    I have no idea. At best I'd suggest to paraphrase it. Perhaps something like this will do:

    bei den Cheerleadern von (Miami Heat/ den Dresden Monarchs/ ...) sein
    or: in einer Cheerleadertruppe mitwirken
    I think we can make it simpler. The German student will know what Cheerleaders are. He will understand that the plural, in English, adds an "s". No problem there. Then I think he will get the idea that in English, "cheerleading" is what "cheerleaders do", just as skiing is what "Skifahrer/Skiläufer do".

    After all, he (or she?) has to learn about "verbing", how we simply take any noun and add "ing" to form words:

    Translating
    Reviewing
    Printing
    Watching TV
    Bird-watching
    Microwaving

    Sometimes there are equivalent words in German, but often not, yet the relationship is pretty obvious, I think.

    Gaer
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Unfortunately I have no German – English dictionary but Russian one says the following:
    cheer-leader [ ] 1) тамада 2) заводила в компании 3) группа поддержки ( спортивной команды )
    Then I looked the word заводила up in a Russian –German dictionary and it assured me, that заводила in Germany will be Obermacher. My poor German has not prevented me from understanding that the word differs a bit from cheer-leader due to Obermacher. Something is wrong with my Russian. :)

    = = =
    The problem is how to turn the concept into a verb!
    = ==
    Don't bother. Mutzysprechender :)
     

    suzzzenn

    Senior Member
    USA English
    As my middle school students would say...Awesome!! Thanks for all your help.


    I took all these forms from a recording I made of kids in the neighborhood, and they tended to use the gerund and/or progressive a lot. The English is messy and full of pauses, laughing, and mistakes, but is very authentic. The problem with teaching a strict, smplified sequence of tenses is that ESL students usually run into the progressve right away, so I usually start there. It is interesting that there is no progressive in German. I need to read a grammar sketch of German sometime soon! I wonder how it happened that English developed a progressive aspect but not German. Or maybe German lost it.
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Wir werden uns Bilder verschiedener Zimmer von typischen amerikanischen Jugendlichen ansehen und dann Tonaufnahmen anhören, in denen sie über ihre Interessen sprechen. Kannst Du erraten, welches Bild und welche Aufnahme zu welchem Zimmer gehören?

    Ich finde Elroys Übersetzung sehr gelungen und auch als Anleitung für eine Schulaufgabe sehr geeignet.

    Softball = Softball
    Cheerleader = Cheerleader

    puppy = Welpe (dog baby), junger Hund (young dog), Hündchen (small, cute dog)

    Kajjo
     

    venenum

    Senior Member
    Croatian/Croatia
    As my middle school students would say...Awesome!! Thanks for all your help.


    I took all these forms from a recording I made of kids in the neighborhood, and they tended to use the gerund and/or progressive a lot. The English is messy and full of pauses, laughing, and mistakes, but is very authentic. The problem with teaching a strict, smplified sequence of tenses is that ESL students usually run into the progressve right away, so I usually start there. It is interesting that there is no progressive in German. I need to read a grammar sketch of German sometime soon! I wonder how it happened that English developed a progressive aspect but not German. Or maybe German lost it.

    German has progressive vs nonprogressive verbs (durative und perfektive Verben) - the verb itself has a component of lasting for a longer time, or being finished.
    Like: schlafen /einschlafen = to sleep (for some/indetermined time) /to fall asleep
    Since this division is made through the semantics of the verb, there was no burning need to additionaly emphasize the duration of the verb. (ad least I understood it this way, I wasn't really paying attention when that was taught. :D )
    Everyone's invited to correct me or ad to this.

    Poison
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    German has progressive vs nonprogressive verbs (durative und perfektive Verben) - the verb itself has a component of lasting for a longer time, or being finished.
    Like: schlafen /einschlafen = to sleep (for some/indetermined time) /to fall asleep
    This is nothing like English progressive tenses and is only going to totally confuse Susan.

    Please keep this basic. It is about helping someone who does not know German! :)

    Gaer
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    German has progressive vs nonprogressive verbs (durative und perfektive Verben) - the verb itself has a component of lasting for a longer time, or being finished.
    Well, it looks like no one is confused except for me. :(

    What are "durative and perfektive verbs/Verben"?
    Like: schlafen /einschlafen = to sleep (for some/indetermined time) /to fall asleep
    Since this division is made through the semantics of the verb, there was no burning need to additionaly emphasize the duration of the verb. (ad least I understood it this way, I wasn't really paying attention when that was taught. :D )
    Everyone's invited to correct me or ad to this.
    I can't correct you, and for all I know you may be 100% correct. I was thinking of tense (progressive present, past, etc.) and the fact that "I am learning", "I was learning" does not exist in German with that kind of verb form. :)

    Gaer
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Gaer, I really don't know it either. However, I guess I do know what Venenum was referring to: Verbs like "schlafen," "leben," "sich verbessern" etc. are durative (or progressing) verbs, i.e. they indicate some duration. Words like "aufstehen," "weggehen," "sich hinlegen" etc. are non-progressing (I don't think "perfective" fits well here - they are different in the Slavic languages, I guess), because you can't do the action very long.

    Nevertheless, I'm not sure what "essen," "singen," or "ausgehen" could be. Sure you can do such an action very long, but normally it doesn't last for a much time.
     
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