Hang sometime to a bar

Golak das

Senior Member
bengali
Hang from a bar. (It means to pull up)

But I saw in a movie a villan was ordering his goon to hang a guy to a bar to death. That was Hindi movie so I doubt the subtitle is grammatically correct. Is that to a bar?
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Please give us the complete sentence, as shown in the subtitle, and explain what was going on in the scene. What do you mean by “hang a guy to a bar to death?”
     

    Golak das

    Senior Member
    bengali
    Thank you miss florentina. Actually the scene was main villan executing a guy by hanging him as he managed to know some dark secrets about his boss. so he ordered his goons.
    Bring him and hang him with the bar.

    Now I was thinking was that grammatically correct as it's an Indian made subtitle thats why. And most Indians often do mistakes in English. The main language of that movie is Hindi.

    Please give us the complete sentence, as shown in the subtitle, and explain what was going on in the scene. What do you mean by “hang a guy to a bar to death?”
    K
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    What did he actually say? To a bar? From a bar? With a bar? You are mixing your prepositions. Is it in a bar?

    You seem to be asking about English in the subtitles, while Hindi is actually being spoken in the film. Can you give us your own translation or interpretation of the Hindi words?

    Can you see in the film what "bar" they are talking about? Is it a place where alcoholic drinks are being served? Is it inside a building or outdoors? Could they mean a beam (for example a joist holding up the upstairs floor)?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Gibbeting, a term I was not familiar with, is shown by WIKI to mean to hang someone from a bar (until dead). I'm not sure it is applicable. But I am sure that almost no one will know what you are talking about if you use the term.

    Gibbeting - Wikipedia

    A gibbet /ˈdʒɪbɪt/ is any instrument of public execution (including guillotine, executioner's block, impalement stake, hanging gallows, or related scaffold), but gibbeting refers to the use of a gallows-type structure from which the dead or dying bodies of criminals were hung on public display to deter other existing or potential criminals. Occasionally the gibbet was also used as a method of execution, with the criminal being left to die of exposure, thirst and/or starvation.[1] The term gibbet may also be used to refer to the practice of placing a criminal on display within a gibbet.[2] This practice is also called "hanging in chains"
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Now I was thinking was that grammatically correct as it's an Indian made subtitle thats why. And most Indians often do mistakes in English. The main language of that movie is Hindi.
    I think this is the problem: that subtitle as it stands doesn't really make sense.

    To be honest, the simplest thing is going to be to post the original Hindi dialogue in the Indo-Iranian Languages forum and ask there for help translating it. :idea:
     

    Golak das

    Senior Member
    bengali
    I
    What did he actually say? To a bar? From a bar? With a bar? You are mixing your prepositions. Is it in a bar?

    You seem to be asking about English in the subtitles, while Hindi is actually being spoken in the film. Can you give us your own translation or interpretation of the Hindi words?

    Can you see in the film what "bar" they are talking about? Is it a place where alcoholic drinks are being served? Is it inside a building or outdoors? Could they mean a beam (for example a joist holding up the upstairs floor)?
    The movie had an English subtitles as the people of South India don't know Hindi well, sorry it should be someone in thread title.

    Yes it was in the bar. Actually I didn't mix preposition intentionally, I just wanted to know different meaning of preposition and to kill one by hanging them in the bar is it correct. To me with sounds better maybe grammatically not. Sorry I may seem confusing to you. But believe me It is mot my intention to puzzle you.😊
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    No, for the choice of preposition it is irrelevant why youy're hanging him. The preposition needs to be "in" because of where you're hanging him: in the bar.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    So it's "in" if we want to hang someone for killing them.
    No, you've misunderstood what you're being told. It's "in" -- in this situation -- because they are in a bar (tavern). It would also be "in" if they were inside any other building or defined space.

    [Cross-posted with Edinburgher]
     

    Golak das

    Senior Member
    bengali
    So it's in the bar regardless one's mentality.
    No, you've misunderstood what you're being told. It's "in" -- in this situation -- because they are in a bar (tavern). It would also be "in" if they were inside any other building or defined space.

    [Cross-posted with Edinburgher]
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    The prepositions need to be sorted out here:
    You hang someone in a place, with a rope, from a metal bar (or from a wooden beam) for (the purpose of) killing him, or for (punishment for) his crime.

    If you hang someone in a tavern (a bar) you are probably going to tie the rope to a lamp that's attached to the ceiling.
     

    Golak das

    Senior Member
    bengali
    This helped a lot thank you.
    The prepositions need to be sorted out here:
    You hang someone in a place, with a rope, from a metal bar (or from a wooden beam) for (the purpose of) killing him, or for (punishment for) his crime.

    If you hang someone in a tavern (a bar) you are probably going to tie the rope to a lamp that's attached to the ceiling.
     
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