hang the picture in crooked / hang the picture crookedly

ridgemao

Senior Member
Chinese - Mandarin
Hello:

My wife was hanging a picture on the wall, but unfortunately the picture was crooked on the wall. So I told her:
1, You hung the picture askew, please straighten the picture.
2, You hung the picture crookedly, please straighten the picture.
3, You hung the picture in crooked, please straighten the picture.

I am sure "askew" is a correct adverb here, because it is a sentence from dictionary. But I am not sure about "crookedly" and "in crooked", are they correct adverbs(phrase) here?


Any suggestions? Thank you.
 
  • Elym97

    Member
    USA
    Castellano, Peru
    If it's just me talking to my husband in an informal conversation I would just say: It's crooked, can you fix it?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    However, replying to the question rather than rewriting the text: "askew" is correct but not commonly used; "crookedly" is also correct. "... in crooked" is wrong, but "you hung the picture crooked" is idiomatic English and is probably what most people would say.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Looking at a crooked painting on the wall, are these four natural to say?

    1. I can see it with the naked eye that the picture is crooked.
    2. I can see it with the naked eye that the picture is not straight.
    3. I can see it with the naked eye that the picture doesn't hang straight.
    4. I can see it with the naked eye that the picture hangs crookedly.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    The 'it' makes the sentences unnatural or incorrect? I thought 'see' was transitive, ie. needing a object.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    So why doesn't the noun phrase serve as direct object here:

    "I don't like that she doesn't believe in God." I guess 'it' is needed after like, isn't it?
     
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