Hang up one's fiddle when one comes home.

shawn EP

New Member
china
Hi guys,

I have some trouble about the adage:Hang up one's fiddle when one comes home.

Need your explan, and thank you in advance
 
  • te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    shawn EP said:
    Hi guys,

    I have some trouble about the adage:Hang up one's fiddle when one comes home.

    Need your explan, and thank you in advance
    Hi shawn EP;
    The only thing I could find was from 19 century slang...


    Hang up one's fiddle: to give up.
    te gato;)
     

    shawn EP

    New Member
    china
    te gato said:
    Hi shawn EP;
    The only thing I could find was from 19 century slang...


    Hang up one's fiddle: to give up.
    te gato;)
    Does that mean someone is in different case when in home or out of home?

    Some one knows?
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    hang up one's sword or gloves or fiddle. Quit, retire, as in He's hanging up his sword next year and moving to Florida. The noun in these expressions refers to the profession one is leaving -- sword for the military, gloves for boxing, and fiddle for music -- but they all are used quite loosely as well, as in the example.
    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?r=2&q=hang up
    I think the "when one comes home" part is just added on to say, "I'm going to finish what I started, and then I will retire." I have heard, "he's going to hang up his gloves," and "I'm going to hang up my fiddle." I have never heard the last part.


    Hope that helps!
    Sharon:)
     

    mirandolina

    Senior Member
    Scotland - English
    It might mean putting outside activities away when one goes home. By that I mean not talking about work all the time at home, not doing the same activities at home as at work....
    But then maybe not.... !
     

    Geoff Bowles

    New Member
    England
    My mother, from Northern Ireland used the expression "Hang one's fiddle on the outside of the door". This meant that everyone outside, ie neibours, friends etc. thought that the person coming home was wonderful or polite or someone to be proud of. But really, once inside the house that person was lazy or mean or whatever. So not really as others outside imagined. Hence we as kids were constantly accused of hanging our fiddle on the outside of the door
     
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