hanging on the phone

< Previous | Next >

Garbuz

Banned
Russian
"You are always hanging on the phone for hours! It's impossible to get through to you!" I wonder if "always' and 'for hours' can combine. Do you think I should get rid of one of them? What would the sentence be like then? "You are always hanging on the phone!" or "You hang on the phone for hours!" ? Thanks in advance.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    While I understand them, and your use of hours is just fine, I would personally drop the "hanging" entirely. You can hang around the house or hang around the mall, but I think you normally hang up the phone: I call you all the time and you're always hanging up on me.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Not quite: we don't usually use two time elements for one event. Always and for hours are both time elements; you need to choose one or the other:

    You're always on the phone.
    You're on the phone for hours.

    Edit: That was my first answer -- now you can check out post 7.
     
    Last edited:

    Thomas Veil

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    "Always" and "for hours" have two different meanings. "Always" refers to frequency, and "for hours" refers to duration. Putting them both in means that this person is on the phone for hours, and this is something that happens a lot.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    "Always" and "for hours" have two different meanings. "Always" refers to frequency, and "for hours" refers to duration. Putting them both in means that this person is on the phone for hours, and this is something that happens a lot.
    Yes, that sounds right. Thanks.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top