Happy holidays!

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Judi27

Member
Spanish
Hello,
How do you say "Happy holidays!" in Japanese?
(written in English please)
Thank you,
Judi:)
 
  • westopia

    Senior Member
    spanish
    Hi,

    How about Akemashite omedetou gozaimasu for Happy New Year? As far as I know, in Japan they don´t celebrate Christmas as we know it, but still you can say meri kurisumasu. Please correct if I´m wrong.
     

    Hiro Sasaki

    Banned
    Japan, Japanese
    Hi,

    How about Akemashite omedetou gozaimasu for Happy New Year? As far as I know, in Japan they don´t celebrate Christmas as we know it, but still you can say meri kurisumasu. Please correct if I´m wrong.
    Osyoogatsu ( the New Year ) is the the only holiday we celebrate saying " Amedetoo gozaimasu - Enhorabuena ! ". We also say " Omedetoo Gozai masu",on some personal happy occasions like birthdays, births of babies,
    weddings and graduations from universities and receiving honors and orders.

    The 3rd March is the festive day for girls. But, we do not say "Omedetoo"
    to girls because it is not a prsonal happy occations.

    Hiro Sasaki
     

    Hiro Sasaki

    Banned
    Japan, Japanese
    Hi,

    How about Akemashite omedetou gozaimasu for Happy New Year? As far as I know, in Japan they don´t celebrate Christmas as we know it, but still you can say meri kurisumasu. Please correct if I´m wrong.

    The Japanese and the chinese peoples will send cards to foreign friends
    personal or business friends overseas saying " Merry Christmas and
    Happy New Year " respecting the religion of Christian people.

    If someone send the same greeting cards to islamic friends, they
    are stupid !

    Hiro Sasaki
     

    s_a_n_t_i

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Argentina)
    Judi, en Japón no se suele decir "Felices Fiestas".
    En navidad, a pesar de que ellos no la festejan como una festividad religiosa [es puramente comercial], suelen decir "merii kurisumasu".
    En año nuevo, que para las religiones budistas y sintoístas sí significa algo religioso [van a los templos, etc], se suele decir "Akemashite Omedetô Gozaimasu", o abreviado "AkeOme".

    Sin embargo, Google realiza para las festividades y aniversarios a lo largo del año diferentes logos. Para las fiestas, suelen poner esto.

    A pesar de que no se diga así [Happii Horidee], supongo que lo tomaron como traducción general de la expresión.

    Espero te sirva,
    Saludos.
     

    Hiro Sasaki

    Banned
    Japan, Japanese
    Judi, en Japón no se suele decir "Felices Fiestas".
    En navidad, a pesar de que ellos no la festejan como una festividad religiosa [es puramente comercial], suelen decir "merii kurisumasu".
    En año nuevo, que para las religiones budistas y sintoístas sí significa algo religioso [van a los templos, etc], se suele decir "Akemashite Omedetô Gozaimasu", o abreviado "AkeOme".

    Sin embargo, Google realiza para las festividades y aniversarios a lo largo del año diferentes logos. Para las fiestas, suelen poner esto.

    A pesar de que no se diga así [Happii Horidee], supongo que lo tomaron como traducción general de la expresión.

    Espero te sirva,
    Saludos.
    I've never heard the abbreviation "AkeOme". Sorry santi, I must correct the information. Even If some crazy young people say so, I would like
    to advise you not to say so.


    Hiro Sasaki
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Japanese omedetō (gozaimasu) is similar but slightly off from English "happy ..." or "congratulations on ..."

    In full awareness that it borders on pompous facetiousness, I would translate it as:
    Blessed is the event that has just happened upon someone.

    New years and birthdays can be understood as happening because a new period begins. Ordinary holidays, however, just come and go, like a milestone passing by out the car window. In Japanese framework they are not construed as happening.
     

    Judi27

    Member
    Spanish
    Japanese omedetō (gozaimasu) is similar but slightly off from English "happy ..." or "congratulations on ..."

    In full awareness that it borders on pompous facetiousness, I would translate it as:
    Blessed is the event that has just happened upon someone.

    New years and birthdays can be understood as happening because a new period begins. Ordinary holidays, however, just come and go, like a milestone passing by out the car window. In Japanese framework they are not construed as happening.
    Flaminius, thank you very much for your correction above.
    Judi.
     

    Judi27

    Member
    Spanish
    Judi, en Japón no se suele decir "Felices Fiestas".
    En navidad, a pesar de que ellos no la festejan como una festividad religiosa [es puramente comercial], suelen decir "merii kurisumasu".
    En año nuevo, que para las religiones budistas y sintoístas sí significa algo religioso [van a los templos, etc], se suele decir "Akemashite Omedetô Gozaimasu", o abreviado "AkeOme".

    Sin embargo, Google realiza para las festividades y aniversarios a lo largo del año diferentes logos. Para las fiestas, suelen poner esto.

    A pesar de que no se diga así [Happii Horidee], supongo que lo tomaron como traducción general de la expresión.

    Espero te sirva,
    Saludos.
    Exelente tu comentario Santi, muy interesante, y claro, quien no vio el logo de Google por las fiestas. :thumbsup:
    Gracias,
    Judi :)
     

    Judi27

    Member
    Spanish
    I've never heard the abbreviation "AkeOme". Sorry santi, I must correct the information. Even If some crazy young people say so, I would like
    to advise you not to say so.


    Hiro Sasaki
    Thank you for contributing a bit of information about your vast culture, I find it absolutely amazing ,the differences between cultures around the world.
    Judi.
     
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