Happy to be your first friend

katie_here

Senior Member
England/English
cześć,

I have a colleague at work who is Polish.

He has joined Facebook and I'm the first (and only) friend he has. (I'm sure that will change in the next 10 minutes).

but quickly, I would like to write him a message that says.

Welcome to Facebook. I'm happy to be your first friend.

He will be very impressed if I write in Polish, as he has his preferred language as Polski.

Dziekuje!.
 
  • Amerykańska kobieta

    Member
    USA
    English - USA
    I will take a stab at this, very beginning Polish learner:

    Jestem szczęśliwa być twoja pierwsza koleżanka.

    This literally translated to: I am happy to be your first friend.

    This is assumes a woman speaking. There are many words for friends (female in these examples), including koleżanka, znajoma and przyjaciólka. Not sure which is most appropriate. The last is for the closest of friends if I learned correctly.

    Now I need some correction and how it really would be said.

    Ak
     

    scarlett_wilk

    New Member
    Polish
    Hello,

    I would agree with what Amerykańska kobieta wrote but I guess more correct sentence would be: "Jestem szczęśliwa, że jestem Twoją pierwszą koleżanką/znajomą." with the capital letter in "Twoją" which is more polite. Although I'd rather say something like this: "Jestem szczęśliwa, że mogę być Twoją pierwszą koleżanką/znajomą."

    So the whole message would be: "Witaj w Facebooku. Jestem szczęśliwa, że mogę być Twoją pierwszą koleżanką/znajomą.".
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    Thankyou for your help. If I understand correctly kolezanka is the same as work associate, or colleague. If so, that's too informal. Would znajoma be better?
     

    scarlett_wilk

    New Member
    Polish
    Not necessarily, koleżanka can mean both a workmate, colleague, and a girlfriend, someone you know but not well.
    The gradation would be something like that:

    przyjaciółka - very close girlfriend;
    koleżanka - quite close but not so close as przyjaciółka; its also used for describing a person you know from college, work etc., and it's more informal than znajoma;
    znajoma - someone you know from college (classmate), work (workmate) etc.,

    But if you think that koleżanka is too informal because you don't know the person you're writing to too well I advise you to use znajoma rather than koleżanka.
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    But if you think that koleżanka is too informal because you don't know the person you're writing to too well I advise you to use znajoma rather than koleżanka.


    Sorry, my mistake. I meant too formal!!!! (not informal)

    I sent the message and used znajoma, but please, have I used the term for a female friend? I did mention it was "him".
     

    scarlett_wilk

    New Member
    Polish
    I sent the message and used znajoma, but please, have I used the term for a female friend? I did mention it was "him".

    To be honest, I'm a bit lost here. If I understand your dilemma correctly, you're not sure if znajoma refers to your friend? Znajoma refers to you as you're a woman, nothing in your message indicates the gender of your friend (I'd say that the message is appropriate for both male and female receiver of the message).
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    Okay, I'm getting confused now. :)

    This is what I wrote at first, in my first post

    but quickly, I would like to write him a message that says.

    Welcome to Facebook. I'm happy to be your first friend.

    Because I don't understand the gender differences (as we don't have them in English, as such), when you said girlfriend, I assume you think my friend is a girl. Is that right.

    My friend is male, (I am female) but I guess you knew that :). I just wanted to make sure that I haven't referred to him as female.

    ahh!!! the penny drops.

    I realise now why we are both confused. Please forgive me. I realise now that I'm referring to myself as his friend, not him as mine.

    I think I'll just go and lie down a while. Just ignore me.
     

    Greg from Poland

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'm not sure whether the fact that you have became his friend can make you "szczęśliwą". I would use "Cieszę się, że zostałam Twoją pierwszą znajomą/koleżanką."

    Still, "szczęśliwa" is also perfectly correct.
     

    mcibor

    Senior Member
    Hi Katie,
    here "koleżanka" refers to you - you are his "girl"friend.
    If you talk to him, you can write that you are his koleżanka,
    if you only say hello and that's all, then you are znajoma.

    I would say, that neighbourgs are mostly znajomi, whereas friend of any kind is koleżanka, kolega

    Word znajomy means, that you know, recognize that person, from verb znać - to know
     

    Greg from Poland

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I totally agree with mcibor.

    Znajomy/znajoma is someone who is on nodding terms with you, whereas kolega/koleżanka is for instance a workmate, classmate or perhaps somebody with whom you have a casual conversation from time to time.
     

    robin74

    Senior Member
    May I point out that we are talking about an actual application, which exists both in Polish and English and uses "znajomy" in a Polish version where it uses "friend" in an English one?

    I'd say "Cieszę się, że zostałam Twoją pierwszą znajomą".
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    Thankyou everyone for you help. I saw my friend today, and he was very impressed with my message. (and even more impressed with my own profile picture of me with blue hair - but that's another story). :)
     

    kknd

    Senior Member
    polski / Polish
    English 'girlfriend' is often translated as dziewczyna (lit. girl) or sometimes sympatia (lit. sympathy); word 'girl-friend' used before in meaning of friend being also a girl should be replaced with something like 'female friend' to avoid confusion.

    I'd translate it as follows:
    Witam w Facebook'u. Cieszę się, że zostałam pierwszą osobą w twoich kontaktach.

    Apostrophe in "Facebook'u" is misplaced; it means that preceding letter isn't read but nothing like this happens in given phrase (k is spoken, cf. "George'a" where e before apostrophe is mute).
     
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