hard boiled eggs

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macdevster

Senior Member
USA, English
Here's a total google translate attempt for "hard-boiled" eggs: яйца вкрутую

How wrong am I??
 
  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    No need for Google Translate on this one, it's in the WR Eng-Ru dictionary here (and with the stress marks). :)

    egg [ɛg] n яйцо́
    hard-boiled/soft-boiled egg яйцо́ вкруту́ю/всмя́тку
    egg on vt (encourage) подстрека́ть (подстрекну́ть perf)
     

    Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Using Google Translate, I tried an associated idiom: "крут как варёное яйцо" and got a surprising: "cool as a boiled egg."
    Although that one may convey the original sense in Russian to a certain extent, I'm not sure if this makes any sense in English for the TS.
     
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    Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    Using Google Translate, I tried an associated idiom: "крут как варёное яйцо" and got a surprising: "cool as a boiled egg."
    Although that one may convey the original sense in Russian to a certain extent, I'm not sure if this makes any sense in English for the TS.
    I think the corresponding English expression would be 'hard as balls', since in Russian "яйца" means both 'eggs' and 'testicles'.
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    I think the corresponding English expression would be 'hard as balls', since in Russian "яйца" means both 'eggs' and 'testicles'.
    Uhm, I don't think there's such an English expression, firstly, because balls, here meaning "testicles", aren't associated with being hard (quite the opposite), and secondly, because hard doesn't mean крутой. Balls is an expletive here and can be replaced by shit, for instance.

    In contrast, the Russian expression you were trying to translate isn't associated with testicles because boiled testicles aren't exactly popular in Russia :)

    There's a fitting "cool as a cucumber", however.
     
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    Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    Uhm, I don't think there's such an English expression, firstly, because balls, here meaning "testicles", aren't associated with being hard (quite the opposite), and secondly, because hard doesn't mean крутой. Balls is an expletive here and can be replaced by shit, for instance.

    In contrast, the Russian expression you were trying to translate isn't associated with testicles because boiled testicles aren't exactly popular in Russia :)

    There's a fitting "cool as a cucumber", however.
    There's for sure, but perhaps its meaning doesn't match the Russian expression that well indeed. :)

    What about "железные яйца" then? In common opinion, the harder the balls are the more "крутой" is the guy. :)
     
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    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    There's for sure, but perhaps its meaning doesn't match the Russian expression that well indeed. :)
    I'm not quite sure if you refer to the same expression here or if the first part refers to the one with the cucumber and the second to the one with balls.:rolleyes:
    What about "железные яйца" then? In common opinion, the harder the balls are the more "крутой" is the guy. :)
    That would be "balls of steel", and to me the Russian expression looks like a calque of the English one; certainly its popularity in the recent years stems from Hollywood translations.
     

    Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    "As balls" is often used as an intensifier, so "hard as balls" means "very hard" ("that exam was hard as balls"). Thus, it is totally wrong as a translation of "крут как варёное яйцо", a better translation might be "cool as ice", although it's not perfect.
     

    Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    "As balls" is often used as an intensifier, so "hard as balls" means "very hard" ("that exam was hard as balls"). Thus, it is totally wrong as a translation of "крут как варёное яйцо", a better translation might be "cool as ice", although it's not perfect.
    The Russian idiom is acid, even derogative, because a real boiled egg isn't really hard nor tough, even if it was hard boiled.
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    The Russian idiom is acid, even derogative, because a real boiled egg isn't really hard nor tough, even if it was hard boiled.
    Well spotted, but I think it's not quite accurate. «Крутой» doesn't mean "hard" or "tough", the direct sense is "steep", non-gradual". In both cases the sense is figurative but different, so the expression is essentially a pun, using one word in two different meanings and comparing the person with an egg in the process. The exact same thing happens in "cool as a cucumber", but "cool" is inherently more approving ("calm and confident") than «крутой» ("flauntingly manly, showing off"). As a result, the Russian expression has a mocking undertone while the English one is approving.
     
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