Hard number

Dandix

Member
Italian
Hi guys,

I need to reply in writing to a customer.
We have an agreement stating they should purchase a determined number of units (2 million pcs) in 2012, while due to volume drop it seems we are receiving a percentage of their overall volumes instead, probably originally corresponding to 2 mln pcs of the initial budget.
In other words, their budget was 4 million pcs, and our volume corresponded in fact to a share equal to 50% originally.
Now it seems we are receiving 50% of their current volumes, significantly decreased due to market issues. Now I want to point out that our agreement is not based on a percentage, but on a hard number, and we expect it is observed.

Is this expression correct? If so, is it colloquial or can be used also in communications pertaining subjects as the above?

Thank you in advance.
 
  • baileymp

    New Member
    English - UK
    Whilst correct, it does sound a bit colloquial for a formal letter, I would use "fixed number of units" or "specific number of units", something along those lines.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi guys,

    I need to reply in writing to a customer.
    We have an agreement stating they should purchase a determined number of units (2 million pcs) in 2012, while due to volume drop it seems we are receiving a percentage of their overall volumes instead, probably originally corresponding to 2 mln pcs of the initial budget.
    In other words, their budget was 4 million pcs, and our volume corresponded in fact to a share equal to 50% originally.
    Now it seems we are receiving 50% of their current volumes, significantly decreased due to market issues. Now I want to point out that our agreement is not based on a percentage, but on a hard number, and we expect it is observed.

    Is this expression correct? If so, is it colloquial or can be used also in communications pertaining subjects as the above?

    Thank you in advance.
    I think the expression is correct, and certainly not colloquial. It seems to me apposite here, because it shows firmly that you expect them to keep to their agreement.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top