Hard pace

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cannyyoung

New Member
Korean
From Dracula by Bram Stoker

"The carriage went at a hard pace straight along, then we made a complete turn and....."

I'm just confused by what this 'hard pace' is supposed to mean. Does this mean that the pace was unchanging and steady? (guessing by the feeling of the adjective) or is it using a different meaning of 'hard' that I do not know?
 
  • cannyyoung

    New Member
    Korean
    Thanks for answering. That was my initial impression of the word too, but I just couldn't find a clear cut definition in the dictionary that would support my impression.
     

    cannyyoung

    New Member
    Korean
    oh yeah now that you mention it people do say "at an easy pace". Somehow I knew that expression but it never dawned upon me that a "hard pace" would be the exact opposite... I feel so silly now.
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's not silly at all. I'm surprised none of the dictionaries have the phrase.

    It's "easy" in the sense of "gentle", and "hard" in the sense of the horse's hooves coming down hard on the ground, I should think.
     
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