hard v. arduous v. heavily

hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
Here is the original: "It is breathing so hard that it must rest for 5 to 10 minutes before it can eat"

Which of the following can we use instead of the original, retaining its meaning?

1. It is breathing so heavy that it must rest for 5 to 10 minutes before it can eat.

2. It is breathing so arduous that it must rest for 5 to 10 minutes before it can eat.

Source:Built for Speed

Thank you.
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Please give us some context, hhtt. What is breathing that hard? The previous sentence would probably be helpful.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Please give us some context, hhtt. What is breathing that hard? The previous sentence would probably be helpful.
    Sorry, I thought it was clear and there was a link.

    "After the hunt, cheetah is exhausted. It is breathing so hard that it must rest for 5 to 10 minutes before it can eat.

    Thank you.
     
    You would have to add the "-ly" adverbial endings to your alternative words:

    breathing heavily

    breathing arduously

    (breathing arduously is grammatically and semantically correct, but I don't think breathing and arduous collocate very well together, and I wouldn't normally expect to see that usage, although it's possible.)

     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    You would have to add the "-ly" adverbial endings to your alternative words:

    breathing heavily

    breathing arduously

    (breathing arduously is grammatically and semantically correct, but I don't think breathing and arduous collocate very well together, and I wouldn't normally expect to see that usage, although it's possible.)
    Are they "breathing so heavily that" and "breathing so arduously that" ? I thought using "so" infront of them make them adverb without adding "-ly" at the end?

    And "breath heavily" a common collocation isn't it?

    Thank you.
     
    Intensifiers do not change parts of speech or influence their endings.

    (He went fast.:thumbsup: He went so fast! :thumbsup:)

    "Breath :cross: heavily" is not common, no, and in the form you have it makes no sense.

    (There could be an imperative instruction, but that would have to be the verb breathe, not the noun breath:)

    Doctor to patient whose lungs he is checking: "Breathe heavily."

    That doesn't collocate well, either, however. :)

    Normally it would be just "Breathe in and out slowly."

    "so verb adverb that..." is a set linking construction introducing further details/consequences in the next phrase or sentence.

    He ran so fast down the hill that he fell down and broke his leg.

    He kicked the ball so forcefully that it split in two. (Not, he kicked the ball so "force":).)
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Doctor to patient whose lungs he is checking: "Breathe heavily."

    That doesn't collocate well, either, however. :)

    Normally it would be just "Breathe in and out slowly."
    Then can we say that "breathe heavily is odd" but "breathe in and out slowly" is correct?

    What do you think about this: "He ran so fast that he was breathing so heavily and he was breathing so heavily that we can hear his breaths from 100 meters away."

    Thank you.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    (There could be an imperative instruction, but that would have to be the verb breathe, not the noun breath:)

    Doctor to patient whose lungs he is checking: "Breathe heavily."

    That doesn't collocate well, either, however. :)

    Normally it would be just "Breathe in and out slowly."
    No, "breath heavily" is incorrect, but "breathe heavily" is fine.
    But as you see, native speaker do not find it "fine"

    Thank you.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "Breathe heavily" is fine, especially in a sentence such as "The exertion made him breathe heavily." It's a little odd as a command, as Dale Texas noted.

    People are trying to help you identify the error you made in #5:
    And "breath heavily" a common collocation isn't it?
     
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