Hardly be able

alex_ln

Senior Member
Polish
Hello
Is the usage of "hardly be able" appropriate and does it mean I almost cant live?
"Should you not have it fixed, I will hardly be able to live in my place."
Thanks
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Here's the WR dictionary definition

    hardly/ˈhɑːdli/
    ▶adverb
    • 1 scarcely; barely; only with great difficulty.
    When you use it in your sentence, you get sentences like these:

    "Should you not have it fixed, I will hardly be able to live in my place only with great difficulty."
    "Should you not have it fixed, I will hardly scarcely be able to live in my place."

    Hope this helps :D
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm afraid your sentence is really hard to understand, alex:(.

    Can you tell us more about the context in which you want to use this sentence?
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'm afraid your sentence is really hard to understand, alex:(.

    Can you tell us more about the context in which you want to use this sentence?
    I asked the landlord to have the hot water fixed, but he has not sent anybody to fix it. Now I'm saying "Should you not have it fixed, I will hardly be able to live in my place."
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Here's the WR dictionary definition


    When you use it in your sentence, you get sentences like these:

    "Should you not have it fixed, I will hardly be able to live in my place only with great difficulty."
    "Should you not have it fixed, I will hardly scarcely be able to live in my place."

    Hope this helps :D
    But you did not use "hardly" in your sentences! You have simply crossed them! Could you please let me know whether my sentence is grammatically correct? If not, how would I be able to use it?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I asked the landlord to have the hot water fixed, but he has not sent anybody to fix it. Now I'm saying "Should you not have it fixed, I will hardly be able to live in my place."
    Thank you for the extra information, alex:).

    The first point to note is that "should you not" is quite formal/literary: in everyday speech, we would say "If you don't".

    The second point is that "I will hardly be able to live here" sounds a bit strange when what you mean is "I [really] won't be able to live here".

    Your sentence, in more natural/idiomatic English, would be something like "If you don't fix it, I won't be able to live here [any more]".
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    But you did not use "hardly" in your sentences! You have simply crossed them! Could you please let me know whether my sentence is grammatically correct? If not, how would I be able to use it?
    I replaced the word "hardly" with the dicitionary definitions so you could see what the sentence with "hardly" means. If you understood the new sentences, you would see that "hardly" was used correctly in your sentences. It was an attempt to illustrate how you might answer your own question without needing additional help, beyond using the dictionary.
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    The second point is that "I will hardly be able to live here" sounds a bit strange when what you mean is "I [really] won't be able to live here".
    Thank you!
    But it means "I [really] won't be able to live here"? and grammatically correct?
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hello
    Is the usage of "hardly be able" appropriate and does it mean I almost cant live?
    "Should you not have it fixed, I will hardly be able to live in my place."
    Thanks
    Maybe you mean: If you don't fix it, I will have a hard time living here. Or: It will be difficult for me to live here.
    Or what JulanStuart has already said in post #2. This means that, although lengthy, your 'result' clause is correct. At least for Julian. Your 'condition' clause with 'should' sounds too formal.
     
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