Has been defaulted

eno2

Senior Member
Dutch-Flemish
Hello,

<Nick Kyrgios has been defaulted from the Italian Open >

I think I understand correctly but he use of he passive voice causes a question:

Has he been defaulted, or has he defaulted, or both?

I think he has defaulted, o defaulted, and then has been defaulted. Correct?

The tite, <Nick Kyrgios defaulted from Italian Open after hurling chair across court> on the other hand, means to convey he 'has been' defaulted.
(Title ellipse)
 
Last edited:
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Both. He defaulted on the code of conduct and as a result was defaulted (officially judged to have defaulted and therefore disqualified).

    The passive version seems to be used mainly, if not entirely, in the context of sports.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    I was not in doubt about that really.
    My question was if he has defaulted and therefore has been defaulted.
    One can default and be defaulted. Breach a contract and being put in breach of contract. Therefore I think it's never 'he has defaulted (himself) but only 'he has defaulted'
    I don't think 'himself' gets ever added to 'He has defaulted.


    Both. He defaulted on the code of conduct and as a result was defaulted (officially judged to have defaulted and therefore disqualified).
    That's what I thought, thanks
    The passive version seems to be used mainly, if not entirely, in the context of sports.
    So only in sports.
    Indeed clearly in the meaning of 'disqualified, barred, sent away,' which is very specific. I don't think it's used to mean or indicate a minor infraction.
     
    Last edited:

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    A loss was attributed to him; for the game, possibly for the tournament (out entirely). He's placed in that status by the organization. I suppose there is a kind of contract, since upon entering the tournament he's agreed to play by their rules and give them the authority to judge their application and decide on his status whether in a game or in the whole tournament.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top