has been died

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Roymalika

Senior Member
Punjabi
My friend, Talha, has been died. (He died a natural death.)
I know the usual way of saying this is "My friend, Talha, has died".
But I wonder if "has been died" is correct too? I am saying this because 'has been' gives an idea that some other person caused him to die. In this case, and in all the cases, it is God who gives a person death. Death is from God - at least for those people who believe in God.

So is it correct to use "has been died"?
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    If you want to express that idea, you'll have to say it differently. English speakers might sometimes quote roughly from the prophet Job and say 'The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away' (or modernised to 'The Lord gives and the Lord takes away'). So, the Lord has taken Talha away, or the Lord has taken Talha home.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Yes, "has been died" sounds as if someone has caused him to die. But the usual phrase in that case is "has been killed" (by a person). That of course doesn't apply in your (friend's) case.
    in all the cases, it is God who gives a person death. Death is from God - at least for those people who believe in God.
    We don't think of god as giving a person death or killing people. As Natkretep says, it's likely to be worded very differently.
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    Since I am not a Christian I would not be using the terms nat suggests. 'Died (of natural causes)' is the simple term in the UK.
    Quite right. :thumbsup: I prefer this neutral point of view, as the earlier suggestion would probably only be given by someone with a religious view on the subject, who believed in Christianity or another monotheistic religion.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    If you want to suggest another agency you can say "She has been taken from us." This implies an agent but doesn't name a specific god or say anything expicitly Christian.
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    If you want to suggest another agency you can say "She has been taken from us." This implies an agent but doesn't name a specific god or say anything expicitly Christian.
    Quite a good suggestion. Please welcome into the room... The Grim Reaper! :D :eek:
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    That does not address the problem of the passive being impossible with intransitive verbs. That means verbs which do not take a direct object, like 'die'. We can't 'die' something or somebody. If we have an object we have to use a transitive verb, such as 'kill', depending on the context. That's called 'active' mode.
    I died the python.:cross: The python has been died.:cross:
    They killed the python.:tick: The python has been killed.:tick:

    The passsive is made with the verb 'to be' in a suitable tense plus the past participle.
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    Sorry, by 'another agency' do you mean a person (killer), a drug etc that has caused the person to die?
    No, it’s more like an unnamed god, or lord of death, etc (your choice, it can be freely interpreted) . It’s just so as not to name a specific deity.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you need to imply "that some other person caused him to die", and "in this case, and in all the cases, it is God who gives a person death", then, because 'was died by' is wrong, you could say 'God killed him'.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Sorry, by 'another agency' do you mean a person (killer), a drug etc that has caused the person to die?
    The agent is anybody or anything that "does" the verb in an active or passive grammatical construction. In an active structure it's always explicit: "Susan wrote this answer" In any passive construction the agent is hidden: "The answer was written". (by whom is missed off)

    The reader or listener might imagine an agent, but none is specified. So yes, in your context it could be drugs, but equally it could be God or any other agent that took the girl from us.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "He has been taken from us" is a common way to express the idea of some cosmic plan without naming who is in charge of the cosmic plan or what the plan is. I don't think anyone normally uses a phrase like "God killed him". They might say "God has chosen to take him from us."
     
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