Has been playing the sax up until now

< Previous | Next >

Shweggeh

Senior Member
Lithuanian (not certain)
"Since morning, he's been playing the sax (up) until now(or up to now)."

If he's only stopped recently can I still use present perfect with "up until now" and "up to now"?
Or does the use of present perfect with "up until now" mean that the action is still an ongoing one? Or can the present perfect be used to mean both?

(I'm not very fond of the sentence that I used for context, to tell the truth but I hope this will make do regardless)
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The word “perfect” implies “completed”, but it’s misleading to say that perfect tenses only refer to completed activities or situations. What they do always refer to is something that happened or was true from some point in the past up to the moment of speaking. But they do not in themselves tell us whether that action or situation will continue. So when you say “He has been doing A since B”, you are referring only to the duration of that activity up to the present moment.

    Since morning, he's been playing the sax until now. :cross:
    Since morning, he's been playing the sax. :tick:
    (conveys the duration of the activity up to the present)​
    He's been playing the sax until now. :tick:
    (the addition of “until now” heavily implies that he has now stopped)​
     

    Shweggeh

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian (not certain)
    The word “perfect” implies “completed”, but it’s misleading to say that perfect tenses only refer to completed activities or situations. What they do always refer to is something that happened or was true from some point in the past up to the moment of speaking. But they do not in themselves tell us whether that action or situation will continue. So when you say “He has been doing A since B”, you are referring only to the duration of that activity up to the present moment.

    Since morning, he's been playing the sax until now. :cross:
    Since morning, he's been playing the sax. :tick:
    (conveys the duration of the activity up to the present)​
    He's been playing the sax until now. :tick:
    (the addition of “until now” heavily implies that he has now stopped)​
    Yeah, I didn't like "since morning" either I don't know what was supposed to be stressed with that. Thanks anyway.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top