has/is

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SRPGgamer

Senior Member
Chinese
Guys please tell what's the difference between these two sentences:

"I thought,the current president has not expired yet"

"I thought,the current president is not expired yet"
 
  • nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    We would need context to be able to help you.

    The "I thought" at the beginning is a bit odd.

    The first sentence, with has, is more usual.

    However, the second sentence, is, somewhat unusually, might be used to add emphasis to the fact that is IS still ALIVE.

    In the first, expire is being used as a verb. In the second, expired is being used an an adjective.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    The difference is that your second sentence is incorrect. If, by "expired", you mean "died", then he "has not died" ("has not expired"). We would not say "is not died yet".
     
    As Dimcl noted, the second sentence is wrong. The first sentence is correct if you mean "the current president is not dead yet", but if you mean something else (and I suspect you do), then the first sentence is also wrong.

    Are you perhaps trying to say:
    I thought the president's term of office had not expired yet?
     

    SRPGgamer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Sorry guys for not being precise. what I was referring to is " the term of duty " I was trying to say that "the current president of Russia should continue to be president, and suddenly decided to choose a new one"
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Sorry guys for not being precise. what I was referring to is " the term of duty " I was trying to say that "the current president of Russia should continue to be president, and suddenly decided to choose a new one"
    Ah... what you mean is that his "term of office (or just plain "term") has not expired yet.

    And your second sentence would still not be correct.
     

    SRPGgamer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Well, the full sentence should be "According to the CNN, Russia is choosing a new president, isn't it ? why? I thought, the current one has/is not expired yet! "

    Dimcl: in certain cases, they are interchangeable, aren't they? I think "is expired" is a passive form, suggesting the current president is not supposed to be expired <---I think using passive form here is grammatically correct. Could you explain for me ?

    Anyway, thanks for helping guys, I really appreicate.
     

    SRPGgamer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    And the reason why I become so confused with it, is because of <'s>, which can be seen in most of the films and texts. It means "is , was ,has" sometimes I really couldn't distinguish which is which. Any key to it? Ironcally, they are sometimes interchangeable but not all the time.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Well, the full sentence should be "According to the CNN, Russia is choosing a new president, isn't it ? why? I thought, the current one has/is not expired yet! "

    Dimcl: in certain cases, they are interchangeable, aren't they? I think "is expired" is a passive form, suggesting the current president is not supposed to be expired <---I think using passive form here is grammatically correct. Could you explain for me ?
    I think that we're now talking about two different things here, SRPGgamer. It is incorrect to say "...the current one has/is not expired yet" when what you mean to refer to is his term of office. To say that someone has expired means that he died.
     
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