"... has (...) no longer any train."

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ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
This is a fragment of a sentence in Thomas Merton's Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander, p. 143 in my copy. The context is about a martyr [Saint Antonin] who is described as follows: "Thy martyr, O Christ, has a deep green river, and a limestone bridge of .../ Thy martyr, O Christ, has cliffs and woods, and, as I understand, nog longer any train."

To me those seem fairly mysterious: "has"??? "Thy martyr has" a river, a bridge, cliffs and woods - aspects of nature, the landscape - but then any train? Not the mechanical engine, I would then, but the only thing I can find is a reference to a scheme, or a trick. But that is not evident in that connection either, I suppose.

Would someone have any idea??
 
  • ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    After having gone on reading, I notice this "has" turns up in other ways, not literally, and refers to a town; so it might still simply be the train. But I still wonder: is there any other option?

    Yet, where do you notice a reference to Africa? And: is there a link between trains, clarinets and gramophones - and the saint? I apologize if I miss out information I should have noticed...
     
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