Has your country ever invaded other country or been invaded?

Mirlo

Senior Member
Castellano, Panamá/ English-USA
The United States Invasion of Panama, code-named Operation Just Cause, was the invasion of Panama by the United States in December 1989. It occurred during the administration of U.S. President George H. W. Bush, and ten years after the Torrijos -Carter Treaties were ratified to transfer control of the Panama Canal from the United States to Panama by 1 January 2000.

During the invasion, de facto Panamanian leader, general, and dictator Manuel Noriega was deposed, president-elect Guillermo Endara sworn into office, and the Panamanian Defense Force dissolved.
It was a short term invasion, but never the less an invasion... :)
 
  • eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Scores of times invaded by Spain, France, Austria, Netherlands, Germany. After WWII, with the EU, that stopped.

    In between, we colonized Congo.
     
    Last edited:
    My country has invaded so many, I don't even know all of them myself, even though I've been a citizen my whole life. And besides, this country has waged quite a few 'covert' wars that the public rarely finds out about. There's probably very few people who know all the countries the US has invaded.

    On the other hand, this country has never really been invaded. The closest thing to an invasion this country has suffered was Pearl Harbor and the 9/11 attacks. The latter was the only attack to ever occur in territory that was actually a part of the US, because Hawaii hadn't been made a state yet at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack. Of course, Pearl Harbor was taken quite seriously. Our history books teach that the attack took out 90% of the US navy. Its often said that if Japan did try to invade the US, the US would've been unable to do anything about it until they made landfall. They actually launched a retaliation bombing shortly thereafter just as a show of force to try and scare them out of invading the mainland. Oh, and interesting tidbit about Pearl Harbor: Japan had actually sent a diplomat to negotiate an alliance or something with the US. He was actually in the white house talking about making friends with the US while Pearl Harbor was happening. He was apparently meant to be a diversion. He even gave the politicians he met medals as gifts. They tied those medals to the bombs they dropped in the retaliation attack I mentioned.

    As for my country's constant warmongering, I assure you that the citizens don't agree with it. Its often said here that the last sensible war this country waged was when they sent troops to Europe to aid the fight against Hitler. During the Vietnam and Korean wars, there was massive protests everywhere. Nobody wanted that war, and no one went into that willingly. In the US we have something called 'the draft' that all male Americans must sign up for. Basically, if they need soldiers they just start drawing names and whose ever name they get must become a solider and do as the US says or be accused of desertion. Virtually everyone who fought in Vietnam was forced to against their will. Honestly, I don't think anyone went to Vietnam willingly. No one was drafted for the war on terror though, which surprised a lot of people when that was discovered. Yeah, everyone who went to the middle east did go there willingly. As for that, well people did initially agree with it. To everyone, Bin Laden was a mass murderer and everyone wanted his head on a pike. Of course, everyone realized that it more about conquest pretty fast, and it became overly obvious when the US invaded Iraq. None of the terrorists in those planes were from Iraq, and Iraq had nothing to do with the US's initially stated goals. Everyone knew it was just a conquest war for their oil wells, which the government did admit to like 10 years later, though I assure you everyone knew that when Iraq was first invaded.

    It took so long for those soldiers to get home, that they started having a problem with soldiers committing suicide because they honestly believed they would never get to go home. And even when they did get to come home, most ended up homeless because the economy had fallen so much in the 10 years or whatever they were gone. They simply didn't know how to make it in society anymore because its so much harder now than it was in 2001. Hell, the late nineties being 'pour' still meant you had a house and cable TV (a new novelty at the time) and no debt. Now, homelessness is on the rise, people have to starve themselves to pay their taxes and everyone's racking up debt that they can't avoid. People are even starting to avoid college because all it does is give you a huge amount of debt that you can never pay off and doesn't open up any more jobs for you. I mean seriously, over a third of people my age and younger are unemployed. And the ones who do have jobs are only able to find petty things like McDonalds to work at. You're lucky if you can find a job where you get paid minimum wage. And yes, you can get away with paying below minimum wage in this country. Certain businesses are exempt from the laws, mostly ones where paying their employees higher than minimum wage would be impossible with the kind of income their industry makes. Also, Wal-mart often hires young people or people with mental disabilities so they can get away with paying them below minimum wage without them asking questions. This country is in really pathetic shape, and its only going to get worse.

    Getting back on topic, the invasion of Iraq and Afghanistan is also why the US was hesitant to help take out Isis. Everyone, even the government, knows Isis exists because of the US invasion. Everyone knows that the entirety of the middle east hates the US now because of what it did. They didn't want to go back there, because they assumed that invading a second would only make things worse. Of course, the attacks in France forced their hand. But still, everyone knows that the US invasion of the middle east was an atrocity that shouldn't have happened and has only resulted in misery and death. Even the government acknowledges this.
     

    WME

    Senior Member
    French-France
    My country has invaded so many, I don't even know all of them myself, even though I've been a citizen my whole life. And besides, this country has waged quite a few 'covert' wars that the public rarely finds out about. There's probably very few people who know all the countries the US has invaded.

    On the other hand, this country has never really been invaded. The closest thing to an invasion this country has suffered was Pearl Harbor and the 9/11 attacks. The latter was the only attack to ever occur in territory that was actually a part of the US, because Hawaii hadn't been made a state yet at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack. Of course, Pearl Harbor was taken quite seriously.
    Hawaii *was* part of the US, athough not as a State, but as an incorporated territory. Supreme Court rulings had made this pretty clear by that time already.
     

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    On the other hand, this country has never really been invaded. The closest thing to an invasion this country has suffered was Pearl Harbor and the 9/11 attacks. The latter was the only attack to ever occur in territory that was actually a part of the US, because Hawaii hadn't been made a state yet at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack.
    As you are surely aware, your country was invaded in the war against Great Britain in 1815. They even burned Washington D.C. (which was under construction at the time).

    There had been several border incidents with Mexico but I would not call it invasions.
     
    I actually don't know any details about the revolution. The history books they give you in school just ramble about how horrible the British were. They go over the causes, then they just saw 'there was a war and the US won'. Honestly, most Americans aren't even aware that Britain tried to reclaim the US shortly after that. Really the only part of American history that most Americans have any familiarly with is the civil war (not sure what non-Americans call it). They also know about World War 2, but only the war in Europe. As for the war in Japan, all most people know is Pearl Harbor then the nuclear bombings. That's it. No one really has a clue what happened in between. Even I don't know how the war with Japan played out between those two points.

    And yes, the American school system sucks, and even shoves propaganda down your throat at times. When I was in school, we would watch some kind of news station for kids (called channel 1, we watched it throughout middle and high school) which really talked about nothing more than the atrocities being committed by China and North Korea, sometimes Russia. Though they haven't said anything bad about China for long while now, I think because the US government decided suddenly that it wanted to make friends with China. Still, virtually all Americans hate China, Russia, and North Korea. Hell, for most of my life I was told that Putin was an out of control despot who did all sorts of horrible things to the Russian people. I don't even know what to believe anymore.
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    most Americans have any familiarly with is the civil war (not sure what non-Americans call it).
    American Civil War is what we call it (as a rule). We drop "American" if it's obvious that that particular war is the topic of conversation.

    As for the war in Japan, all most people know is Pearl Harbor then the nuclear bombings. That's it. No one really has a clue what happened in between. Even I don't know how the war with Japan played out between those two points
    Not the Battle of Midway? If nothing else, it's a good film :).

    I wouldn't be surprised if younger British people's knowledge of the Second World War is equally as poor (although I could be totally unfair with that statement*). Sure, we all know that we won the war (seemingly single-handed if you hear some people!), and people know bits about individual battles or actions (e.g. Battle of Britain and the Blitz, D-Day, Dambuster raid), but beyond that I doubt many people know a huge amount more. I seriously doubt that Britain's dismal display against the Japanese at Hong Kong and Singapore, and our long fight in Burma is really known now. And that doesn't even begin on aspects of the war that didn't involve Britain.

    *many people of my generation and older grew up on a diet of war films and documentaries which helped to educate the public about the war. In those days we only had three or four channels at the most, so you generally ended up watching such films or programmes as there was little else on. These days, you can still find those films/programmes but they compete against Thor-knows how many channels so I doubt today's TV-viewing public get to see a lot of those things.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I actually don't know any details about the revolution.
    I would suggest that your whole knowledge of history is sadly deficient. Under those circumstances, you may want to reconsider whether you should make grand, sweeping statements about how the US (or any other country) has acted through history until you are in possession of more information, and a better understanding of events in the past.

    Still, virtually all Americans hate China, Russia, and North Korea.
    And you base this statement about the opinions of "virtually all Americans" on ... what, exactly? My own experience is that most Americans don't think about other countries at all, let alone think about them enough to hate them. Furthermore, if Americans all had this hatred of Russia that you claim, why then did Russian-apologist Donald Trump get elected?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Excellent point, GWB. I cannot reconcile in my mind how Republicans have moved from Reagan calling Russia "the evil empire" to supporting a candidate who praises (and is praised by) Putin. It boggles the mind. Perhaps this ignorance of history is a big part of the problem.
     
    Explain how a guy who wants to kick all Muslims out of the country got elected. Explain how a guy who wants to bankrupt this country building a wall got elected. Explain how an obvious narcissist who has had over 3000 people file lawsuits against him for fraud got elected. Explain why Americans would put a guy like this into a position where he can initiate a nuclear exchange without anyone being able to intervene.

    I can't fathom how he got elected. Was Hillary really that much worse of a candidate? I think that's what everyone is blaming for this.

    I really see no hope for this country anymore. I seriously believe I'm going to live to see its collapse. I just hope I'm not still living here when that happens.
     

    Doraemon-

    Senior Member
    "Spanish - Spain" "Catalan - Valencia"
    I can only think on Iceland and very small islands (Pitcairn...) that have never been invaded (they descend from the first settlers arrived over the place).
    Every other country has been invaded at one time or another of its history. Many others, much less, have also invaded others (specially Britain, France, Spain, Germany, Mongolia, US, Turkey...).
     

    Doraemon-

    Senior Member
    "Spanish - Spain" "Catalan - Valencia"
    Partially agreed. You were a part of British state most of time. As a sad way to save my pathetic and sweeping comment (well, Switzerland, Andorra and Austria has neither invaded Spain) I would say there is a legend about Celtics from Ireland migrating to Asturias and Galicia (NW Spain).
    Austria did. Succession war (1701-1713).
     

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Austria did. Succession war (1701-1713).
    Agreed. They were supporting the Austrian pretender to the Spanish crown. According to them, they did not feel like invading. I would count it, anyhow.

    Swiss have invaded Spain as a part of Napoleonic army and Swiss mercenaries have fought against (and with, for the record) Spanish troops, though not (as far as I know) in current Spanish soil.

    I will have to search about Andorra's military conflicts to discard them from the invaders of Spain.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (US Northeast)
    Should Turkey be held responsible for the crimes, conquests, invasions, murders committed by the Ottoman Empire?
    Recently a group of Italians informed me that Italy was the continuation of the Roman Empire. Of course, they emphasized the positive aspects that this entity brought the world. But where empires are concerned you cannot cherry-pick the good and disown the evil. It sounds a bit absurd to allege that Italy invaded Great Britain and Judea though. Likewise that Italy created the Latin Alphabet, a calendar, measurements, a code of law, astronomy, roads, etc.
    I wonder if Turks feel they have inherited this empire, the positive and/or the negative aspects thereof?
     
    Last edited:

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Recently a group of Italians informed me that Italy was the continuation of the Roman Empire. Of course, they emphasized the positive aspects that this entity brought the world. But where empires are concerned you cannot cherry-pick the good and disown the evil.
    In case of the Roman Empire, I think most of us (Italians or not) would think of the positive aspects; rightfully in my opinion. The Roman Empire lasted more than 400 years and Rome itself more than 1200 years. The Roman Empire stretched from north-western Europe to the Near East. As for its civilisation: Literature, architecture, music, philosophy, history, laws, roads , theaters, stadiums ...
     

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    You should add the "extra millennium" that the Byzantin Empire provided.

    I know it is a cliche, but you have provoked me.



    Anyhow, the way that Romans made the aqueducts and sanitation can not be ignored.

    [60] Beguiled by these promises they left their own habitations and came together at the place where Galba directed. He divided them into three parts, and showing to each division a certain plain, he commanded them to remain in this open country until he should assign them their places.

    Then he came to the first division and told them as friends to lay down their arms. When they had done so he surrounded them with a ditch and sent in soldiers with swords who slew them all, they, meanwhile, crying aloud and invoking the names and faith of the gods. In like manner he hastened to the second and third divisions and destroyed them while they were still ignorant of the fate of the first. Thus he avenged treachery with treachery in a manner unworthy of a Roman, but imitating barbarians.

    A few escaped, among them Viriathus, who not long afterward became the leader of the Lusitanians and killed many Romans and performed the greatest exploits, which I shall relate hereafter.

    Galba, being even more greedy than Lucullus, distributed a little of the plunder to the army and a little to his friends and kept the rest himself, although he was already one of the richest of the Romans. Not even in time of peace, they say, did he abstain from lying and perjury in order to get gain. Although generally hated, and called to account for his rascalities, he escaped punishment by means of his wealth.
     

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    :thumbsup::D:p Excellent. Love those videos. So could we replace Romans with Italians and it be the same thing? :)
    What have the Italians done for us?

    - Well, Renaissance.

    - Of course, Renaissance, everybody knows that, but...

    - Pizza and pasta.

    - Oh, yes, half the world eats pizza and pasta. But, apart from that, what have they done for us?

    - Opera...
    - Venice, Rome, Naples, Firenze...
    - Accounting...
    - Fibonacci, Toscanelli.
     

    Tao

    Senior Member
    Dutch
    The Netherlands were once invaded and controlled by France and later by nazi Germany. The Netherlands once took control of and colonized Indonesia starting in the 17th century. It also colonized Surinam in South America.
     

    Doraemon-

    Senior Member
    "Spanish - Spain" "Catalan - Valencia"
    The Netherlands were once invaded and controlled by France and later by nazi Germany. The Netherlands once took control of and colonized Indonesia starting in the 17th century. It also colonized Surinam in South America.
    Also Sri Lanka, India, Taiwan, Brazil, Antilles, New England (New Netherland), South Africa...
     

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Also Sri Lanka, India, Taiwan, Brazil, Antilles, New England (New Netherland), South Africa...
    And Belgium (several times), France (Nap wars), Spain (War of Spanish Succession), briefly UK (last time the Glorious Revolution) and I am sure I forget something.

    Of course, they were also invaded by Spain (or Spanish/Austrian Netherlands).
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    -
    Swedish
    I think the list is shorter when mentioning European countries which Germany or German states have never invaded. :D

    Sweden
    Does the Teutonic Order count as a part of Germany? They invaded the island of Gotland in 1398.
    Then there was Albert of Mecklenburg in 1363, who, even if he had a right to the Swedish crown and was asked by some Swedish nobles to become king, did launch an invasion of Sweden, supporten by German nobles and Hanseatic cities, to oust an unpopular king. His invasion did succeed, but it was followed by eight years of civil war, and he was never accepted as king by all Swedes.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Canadian territory has not been invaded in its entire history. Nor have we invaded anyone. But we are a small country isolated from everyone except the U.S. so that is understandable. However when we were a British colony there were a couple of wars between the British, French, and Americans on what is now Canadian soil.
    A small country with a territory over 10 000 000 square kilometers!
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    In fact, in Latvia and Estonia people tend to think that their countries were actually forced into the Soviet Union.
    Do you really believe that people in Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia only think that their countries were forced to become parts of the Soviet Empire, but it was not really so? Do you believe that Poland, Czechoslovakia Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria really wished to become vassals of the Soviet Union?
     

    Kaxgufen

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    Do you really believe that people in Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia only think that their countries were forced to become parts of the Soviet Empire, but it was not really so? Do you believe that Poland, Czechoslovakia Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria really wished to become vassals of the Soviet Union?
    Tal vez sí, tal vez no. Hubo gente que estuvo bastante conforme, como en todas partes sucede. Fue una garantía para la continuidad de un sistema y quien estuvo de acuerdo lo apoyó.
     

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Tal vez sí, tal vez no. Hubo gente que estuvo bastante conforme, como en todas partes sucede. Fue una garantía para la continuidad de un sistema y quien estuvo de acuerdo lo apoyó.
    Are you saying there was a widespread support in Central/East Europe to become satellites of USSR? Apart from the Communist Parties, I mean.

    There was a joke in Poland in Cold War Era:

    Two Poles: Are the Soviets our friends or our brothers? Certainly they are our brothers, because you choose your friends.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Are you saying there was a widespread support in Central/East Europe to become satellites of USSR? Apart from the Communist Parties, I mean.

    There was a joke in Poland in Cold War Era:

    Two Poles: Are the Soviets our friends or our brothers? Certainly they are our brothers, because you choose your friends.
    The Polish Communist Party was annihilated by the Soviet Union i 1938. Most of the members were summoned to Moscow and killed. Soviets created then their own Polish Communist Party consisting of their loyal agents only and send them to Poland i 1944. The next step was to organize a Security Police in Poland consisting only of people loyal to Soviets. Then they gradually took control over everything, concluding the process in 1948 when the last independent organization was banned and the last people opposing actively the process jailed or shot.
    You can read a very good report on this subject in Anne Applebaum's book Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe 1944–1956.
     

    Doraemon-

    Senior Member
    "Spanish - Spain" "Catalan - Valencia"
    Canadian territory has not been invaded in its entire history...
    A small country with a territory over 10 000 000 square kilometers!
    And product of an invasion of the French and the English over natives land, and between them.
    The USA also invaded Canada in 1775 and 1812.
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    Unfortunately, I just have no time for writing a looong answer to this, but I can think right now of a very good (seems to be good, at least!) example.
    It's Russian-Estonian/Latvian relationships.
    The point is that Latvia, Lithuania and Estonis joined the Soviet Union not so deliberately as some other countries do. In fact, in Latvia and Estonia people tend to think that their countries were actually forced into the Soviet Union. So these three countries (Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia) were the first to leave the Union in 1991. But the decades of Soviet reign has left the most bitter feelings, and now Estonia and Latvia don't show much friendliness towards the Russians who still live in these countries.
    I don't know much about the actual situation in Latvia, but a friend of mine lives in Tallinn, and fron her words I know that Estonian government has introduced, for instance, a state exam in Estonian, which is absolutely obligatory...
    Let alone the situation with the so-called Estonian Legion. It's really scary!:mad:
    As someone who lives in a place that has dealt with language issues, I just need to reply to this, no matter how old this post is.
    Please read the following quote.
    Anton, a 24-year-old Russian speaking student from Tallinn, considers Estonia to be his home. Furthermore, he shuns the notion of being defined as a Russian compatriot. He argues: “I do not consider myself as a compatriot, because apart from the Russian language, nothing ties me with Russia.”
    He also added that he has “sworn allegiance to Estonia”. When asked if he thinks that Russian speakers in Estonia have legitimate grievances, he provided a quick and brief response, “What kind of provocative question [is that]… I’m fine.” He wittily added, “The ones who do all the complaining, do not do anything. At school they needed to learn [the Estonian language], but not drink in the alleys.” For those Russian speakers that would say they require Russia’s protection, he provided a short but firm answer suggesting that Russia is only a short train ride away: ”If they think they need Russia’s protection, please…luggage, station, Russia.”
    The new generation of Baltic Russian speakers

    I have no problem at all with Russians living in Estonia or Walloons living in Flanders, but French and Russian are irrelevant languages in these places, just like Dutch and Estonian are irrelevant in Wallonia and Russia.

    EDIT: Mind you, I don't mind people who speak their mother tongue in my city. As long as they learn / have learnt basic Dutch.
     
    Last edited:

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Certainly not. It was Britain by then, Canada did not exist before 1867.
    Of course, you are right, but Doraemon was answering a post which talked about Canadian territory. I assume he used "Canada" for short. For all territories belonging in the past to a bigger realm the question of the OP is tricky, since many countries appear as falsely peaceful, when they have quarrelled a lot as a part of another country.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Poner una PICA en FLANDES: Alva.
    Spanish Fury.
    The biggest fury of which was the plunder of Antwerp by Spanish troops of Alva. But a lot of Flemish cities got looted by the inventors of the Flamenco. They felt so heartbroken by being so far away from their country.
    I can honestly swear we Flemish never invaded any country, while the Spanish invaded practically the whole of the Americas. We just let the Spanish, the French, the Dutch, the Germans invade us in successive waves and tried to survive. First we ourselves, and then our language.
     
    Last edited:

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    But a lot of Flemish cities got looted by the inventors of the Flamenco.
    The Flemish. :D

    About Alva (Fernando Álvarez de Toledo, duke of Alba): Technically speaking, Spaniards did not invade anything in the "Spanish" Netherlands (Flandes, in Spanish usual parlance). They were trying to quell the rebellion of those provinces, which were governed by a king (Emperor Charles V) who was born as Flemish (in Ghent).

    Under Phillip the 2nd and his successors (quasi-autonomous in internal affairs), until 1713, most of the troops under "Spanish" rule (many generals were Italian, French or Belgian) were Belgian. The Spaniards (and Italians, and Germans) did the role of US marines in Vietnam. Most of the fighters were from the place where the fight happened, for simple economic reasons.

    And the Dutch burned, raped, looted and slaughtered as well. As anecdotical evidence, I remember a poster in a Flemish church (Ghent?, Brugge?), claiming it was burned by the Calvinists.

    I can honestly swear we Flemish never invaded any country, while the Spanish invaded practically the whole of the Americas. We just let the Spanish, the French, the Dutch, the Germans invade us in successive waves and tried to survive. First we ourselves, and then our language.
    Since Belgium was born in 1830 as a small nation among biggest nations when most of the colonial pie was done, I do not give you much credit. Anyhow, there is a nice little country, in the midst of Africa, which probably would disagree.

    As a part of biggest realms, Belgians did invade other countries. They come to my mind (before Belgium was born, right) the Guardias Valonas (at the service of Spain), and Belgian troops under the rule of Napoleon and then Wellington.

    After Belgium was born, you invaded Germany when Germany surrendered in WWI. In WWII, SS had both Walloon and Flemish sections, which invaded just the same countries Germany did.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Germany was the aggressor, invader and occupier in the first place but got beaten back
    You are deliberately violating the term invasion. Belgium took part indeed in the postwar occupations and pacifying of Germany. . My educators were hit (and ruined) TWICE by German invasions and in my birth region hundreds of thousand perished in a radius of less than 25 km.
    As for Alva, he has a confirmed and well earned reputation as a merciless looter and butcher. A thing his successor Farnese totally refrained from, which even his enemies conceded to his honour. Anyhow, it were the Spanish that split the Netherlands 19 provinces. Later followed multiple invasions of the French and dominance of the francophone elite in which we almost lost our native language.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but Colonialism is a Spanish recipe developed in the times of Colón (Columbus)
     
    Last edited:

    Fernando

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Germany was the aggressor, invader and occupier in the first place but got beaten back
    You are deliberately violating the term invasion. Belgium took part indeed in the postwar occupations and pacifying of Germany. . My educators were hit (and ruined) TWICE by German invasions and in my birth region hundreds of thousand perished in a radius of less than 25 km.
    I did not deny that. I said you invaded. As a response to a deliberate and unprovoked attack, of course. But the thread is about invasions not fair or unfair invasions.

    As for Alva, he has a confirmed and well earned reputation as a merciless looter and butcher. A thing his successor Farnese totally refrained from, which even his enemies conceded to his honour.
    Butcher, maybe. Looter, much the same as every general as his time.

    Anyhow, it were the Spanish that split the Netherlands 19 provinces.
    Simply no. They split themselves. Spaniards simply avoided that one band of the civil war "ate" the whole cake. Who was right and wrong is a nice question, out of the scope of this thread.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but Colonialism is a Spanish recipe developed in the times of Colón (Columbus)
    You are wrong. Colonialism has existed from the very beginning of Mankind and Romans patented the word. About modern colonization you could be right (Columbus was Italian, but granted), though Northern Europeans were much better in exploiting merciless the local resources.

    But again, out of scope. The question is who invaded who, not why.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top