Has

Oros

Senior Member
Korean
The death of Yasser Arafat in November and last month's election of Mr Abbas have radically changed the political landscape.

Both Mr Sharon and the US had refused to negotiate with Arafat, branding him an obstacle to peace.


The US has strongly praised the Palestinian election as a step towards democracy and has welcomed the efforts of Mr Abbas to get militant factions to agree to an informal cessation of hostilities.


Ms Rice is heading to Israel from Turkey - part of her seven-day tour of Europe and the Middle East.



+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Please read the following in the above:

US has strongly praised the Palestinian election as a step towards democracy and has welcomed ..............................

If I wrote the above, I wouldn't write the verb 'has' here.

US praises the elections process and welcomed the efforts of Mr Abbas.



Finally, the last sentence has two hyphenations.


Ms Rice is heading to Israel from Turkey - part of her seven-day tour of Europe and the Middle East.


Instead of the first hyphenation, I would write the words 'as a ' . So it will be 'from Turkey as a part of her seven day tour of Europe.


Even the words seven day is hyphenated. Why is that?
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hello Oros,
    In your suggested substitue sentence, you use both the present and past tenses. This is wrong. Pick the one you prefer, and use it. The original sentence is correct as it stands. It is written as 'Has praised' and 'has welcomed' to show that the praise occurred previously and to imply that the posture of the US continues to be one of praise and welcome.

    Cuchu
    Oros said:
    The death of Yasser Arafat in November and last month's election of Mr Abbas have radically changed the political landscape.

    Both Mr Sharon and the US had refused to negotiate with Arafat, branding him an obstacle to peace.


    The US has strongly praised the Palestinian election as a step towards democracy and has welcomed the efforts of Mr Abbas to get militant factions to agree to an informal cessation of hostilities.


    Ms Rice is heading to Israel from Turkey - part of her seven-day tour of Europe and the Middle East.



    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Please read the following in the above:

    US has strongly praised the Palestinian election as a step towards democracy and has welcomed ..............................

    If I wrote the above, I wouldn't write the verb 'has' here.

    US praises the elections process and welcomed the efforts of Mr Abbas.



    Finally, the last sentence has two hyphenations.


    Ms Rice is heading to Israel from Turkey - part of her seven-day tour of Europe and the Middle East.


    Instead of the first hyphenation, I would write the words 'as a ' . So it will be 'from Turkey as a part of her seven day tour of Europe.


    Even the words seven day is hyphenated. Why is that?
     

    Oros

    Senior Member
    Korean
    The US has strongly praised the Palestinian election as a step towards democracy and has welcomed the efforts of Mr Abbas to get militant factions to agree to an informal cessation of hostilities.


    So your point is as follows:

    The US has strongly praised .............

    ..... steps towards democracy and has welcomed the efforts ........

    The above are present perfect tense constructions. It will be improper to mix both present perfect and present tense. I would accept your reply.


    Do we really need the second word of 'has' in the given case? I mean the first word of 'has' is sufficient.
     

    Rob625

    Senior Member
    English - England
    OrosFinally said:
    Ms Rice is heading to Israel from Turkey - part of her seven-day tour of Europe and the Middle East.


    Instead of the first hyphenation, I would write the words 'as a ' . So it will be 'from Turkey as a part of her seven day tour of Europe.


    Even the words seven day is hyphenated. Why is that?
    The first is not a hyphen. The dash, used this way, is similar to a colon. It could be written:
    Ms Rice is heading to Israel from Turkey: part of her seven-day tour of Europe and the Middle East.
    For the second, we use a hyphen when we make a phrase into an adjective.

    The tour lasted seven days.
    It was a seven-day tour.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top