hat trick [in non-sport context]

danielxu85

Senior Member
Mandarin Chinese
I think that "hat trick" is a soccer metaphor. Three successes one after the other is a hat trick.

I am just wondering if I could use it outside the context of soccer. Is it idiomatic to say "John pulled a hat trick in the three most recent practice exams in his class"?
 
  • katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    Hi again Daniel,

    Yes, you can use "hat-trick" outside the context of soccer (or football as it is known here). It's origins began in cricket according to Wikipaedia, although I can't vouch for it's authenticity, I know that it doesn't just apply to football.
     

    danielxu85

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    Thanks so much Katie! I am wondering if you could give me a non-sport context in which you would recommend me to use this phrase.
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    Well you could go out and "score" with 3 different girls on 3 consecutive nights":D

    Danielxu and the Rockers have scored a hat-trick with their debut album They were awarded the NME Newcomers Award, A Platinum disc for their No. 1 hit single and an Outstanding Achievement Award. What a way to start 2008!


    How's that!.
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    The earliest mention I have found is 1858, in cricket: 3 wickets with 3 balls bowled in succession. The bowler is reputed to have been presented with a new hat as a result.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I'm with GWB on this one. In ice hockey it is difficult for an individual to get three goals past a goaltender. It is rare. It is a hat trick which in the USA reserved for ice hockey. I have never seen it used figuratively in print for any other subject. It is likely used in soccer here since the coaches in the upper levels; ie. pros,colleges, large high schools, usually have a European background.
     
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