Hat trick

Discussion in 'English Only' started by dcerbi, Jul 17, 2011.

  1. dcerbi New Member

    Brazilian Portuguese
    I need some help with this term...
    I understand that when applied in a soccer game, to a player for example it means that he scored three goals...Is this correct? Or it also may state that some player made something outstanding? It is like the term "cherry on the cake"?
     
  2. armour65 Senior Member

    New York City
    United States English
     
  3. A.O.T. Senior Member

    Ukraine
    Ukrainian
    It's correct but these three goals were scored by him/her in the same match.
     
  4. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    It started out in cricket and there has the definition of three wickets in successive balls (deliveries, pitches). It is now associated with doing things in threes in other activities.
     
  5. Fabulist Banned

    Annandale, Virginia, USA
    American English
    Since it is considered to be a terrible, awful, unwatchable game if two teams score three goals between them—where were the defenses???:eek:I can't imagine that you would ever hear the term applied to a soccer "match." Where it is heard is in relation to an ice hockey game, where one player does occasionally score three goals.
     
  6. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    It's not s rare as you might think and the record in the English football league stands at 140 seconds for scoring three goals in the English football league, while in the Premiership, the record is 4 minutes and 33 seconds.
     
  7. A.O.T. Senior Member

    Ukraine
    Ukrainian
    Fortunately in Europe you can hear a term "football" because this is the real name of this game rather than americanized "soccer" and the same story can be said about a word "match", i.e. two halves of a single football game.
     
  8. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    Surprisingly to some, the term soccer comes from England ! From the wiki on Association Football.
    *Like rugger for Rugby football.
     
  9. A.O.T. Senior Member

    Ukraine
    Ukrainian
    There is nothing new except what is forgotten. :)
    Anyway when you, JulianStuart, speak about a British (European) football you usually use a word "soccer" in the USA, don't you? ;)
     
  10. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    When I'm in my country of origin (UK) I call it football, but when I'm in the US I call it soccer - because if I say football I mean the ball game played mostly with the hands :eek:
     
  11. Egmont Senior Member

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    English - U.S.
    It's my understanding that the term started in North American ice hockey many decades ago. Whenever a player scored three goals in one game, a rare but not unheard of event, spectators would congratulate him by tossing their hats onto the ice.

    Since then the term has been loosened to include any combination of three goals and assists, which makes it a bit easier to achieve but still far from a trivial accomplishment. Also, spectators no longer throw hats onto the ice: partly because it creates a mess, partly because fewer men wear them these days.

    Its use in other sports, again subject to my understanding being correct, came about later.
     
  12. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    It may be that the hockey and cricket "hat-tricks have independent origins, but the cricket one seems to be earlier. I wasn't there to witness either so cannot add to the weight of either story :D

    From the wiki I quoted above - 15+ decades ago :D
     
  13. dcerbi New Member

    Brazilian Portuguese
    First time I heard the term was in a football game between Barcelona and Valencia back in 2001, when Barcelona won 3-2 and Rivaldo made the three goals, the last one a marvelous bycicle kick. But i thought i could use when someone makes somenthing incredible.
     
  14. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    They need to do something difficult three times in a game to earn the title of hat-trick.
     
  15. Egmont Senior Member

    Massachusetts, U.S.
    English - U.S.
    Thank you! As a North American, I don't hear about cricket much. I am quite willing to accept that its use there came earlier.
     

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