Hat trick

dcerbi

New Member
Brazilian Portuguese
I need some help with this term...
I understand that when applied in a soccer game, to a player for example it means that he scored three goals...Is this correct? Or it also may state that some player made something outstanding? It is like the term "cherry on the cake"?
 
  • armour65

    Senior Member
    United States English
    I need some help with this term...
    I understand that when applied in a soccer game, to a player for example it means that he scored three goals...Is this correct?:tick: Or it also may state that some player made something outstanding? It is like the term "cherry on the cake"?
     

    A.O.T.

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian
    I need some help with this term...
    I understand that when applied in a soccer game, to a player for example it means that he scored three goals...Is this correct?
    It's correct but these three goals were scored by him/her in the same match.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    Since it is considered to be a terrible, awful, unwatchable game if two teams score three goals between them—where were the defenses???:eek:I can't imagine that you would ever hear the term applied to a soccer "match." Where it is heard is in relation to an ice hockey game, where one player does occasionally score three goals.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It's not s rare as you might think and the record in the English football league stands at 140 seconds for scoring three goals in the English football league, while in the Premiership, the record is 4 minutes and 33 seconds.
     

    A.O.T.

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian
    Since it is considered to be a terrible, awful, unwatchable game if two teams score three goals between them—where were the defenses???:eek:I can't imagine that you would ever hear the term applied to a soccer "match." Where it is heard is in relation to an ice hockey game, where one player does occasionally score three goals.
    Fortunately in Europe you can hear a term "football" because this is the real name of this game rather than americanized "soccer" and the same story can be said about a word "match", i.e. two halves of a single football game.
     

    A.O.T.

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian
    There is nothing new except what is forgotten. :)
    Anyway when you, JulianStuart, speak about a British (European) football you usually use a word "soccer" in the USA, don't you? ;)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    When I'm in my country of origin (UK) I call it football, but when I'm in the US I call it soccer - because if I say football I mean the ball game played mostly with the hands :eek:
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's my understanding that the term started in North American ice hockey many decades ago. Whenever a player scored three goals in one game, a rare but not unheard of event, spectators would congratulate him by tossing their hats onto the ice.

    Since then the term has been loosened to include any combination of three goals and assists, which makes it a bit easier to achieve but still far from a trivial accomplishment. Also, spectators no longer throw hats onto the ice: partly because it creates a mess, partly because fewer men wear them these days.

    Its use in other sports, again subject to my understanding being correct, came about later.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It may be that the hockey and cricket "hat-tricks have independent origins, but the cricket one seems to be earlier. I wasn't there to witness either so cannot add to the weight of either story :D

    From the wiki I quoted above - 15+ decades ago :D
    The term was first used in 1858 in cricket to describe HH Stephenson's feat of taking three wickets in three balls,

    The footnote: (suppported by an OED of some sort)
    A collection was held for Stephenson (as was customary for outstanding feats by professionals) and he was presented with a cap or hat bought with the proceeds."
    In both field hockey and ice hockey, a hat trick occurs when a player scores three goals in a single game. A hat trick, as it is known in its current form, culminates with fans throwing hats onto the ice from the stands. The tradition is said to have begun among fans in the National Hockey League around the 1950s.[13]
     

    dcerbi

    New Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    First time I heard the term was in a football game between Barcelona and Valencia back in 2001, when Barcelona won 3-2 and Rivaldo made the three goals, the last one a marvelous bycicle kick. But i thought i could use when someone makes somenthing incredible.
     
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