Hats off!

elroy

Imperfect Mod
US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
I know that we can and do say كل احترامي (kul i7tiraami; all my respect), but does Arabic have a similar respect-showing expression involving a hat? Many other languages do, like French (chapeau bas), German (Hut ab), and Czech (klobouk dolů). Notice that these languages are from different families.

Furthermore, I know that the Hebrew expression, כל הכבוד (kol hakavod; all the respect), includes no reference to a hat, either. Could it be a Semitic thing? :)

 
  • cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    :) Actually, I think I've heard/read the expression رفع القبعة لـ (something like : hadha shay2un yasta7iqqu an turfa3a lahu 'l-qubba3aat)
    The sure thing is that it's not a very common expression.
    It may indeed be a semitic thing :D
    No really, I think it's more of a "social" thing, for the simple reason the people in East don't really wear hats. (do you think it's a logical enough reason ?) I'm not sure, just guessing.
     

    amikama

    a mi modo
    עברית
    elroy said:
    Furthermore, I know that the Hebrew expression, כל הכבוד (kol hakavod; all the respect), includes no reference to a hat, either. Could it be a Semitic thing? :)

    You can also say אני מוריד את הכובע בפניך (I take off my hat to you), but this expression is borrowed from English or Russian.
    Also, according to the Jewish Law (Halacha) a man must not be bareheaded, so he can't show respect by taking off his hat. So yes, maybe it's a Semitic thing ;)
     

    DAH

    Senior Member
    USA/California--English
    cultures are different wherein different gestures signify a form of respect or even mutual respect. The Japanese bow to one another. I've seen Japanese people (at the bank)here in Los Angeles who were speaking on the telephone and made a gesture of a bow while they are talking to the person on the other end of the line.
     

    NICE-LADY

    Member
    ARABIC
    amikama said:
    You can also say אני מוריד את הכובע בפניך (I take off my hat to you), but this expression is borrowed from English or Russian.
    Also, according to the Jewish Law (Halacha) a man must not be bareheaded, so he can't show respect by taking off his hat. So yes, maybe it's a Semitic thing ;)
    I think 'moriid it hakuuva3' is very common in Hebrew. But in Arabic, when my friends and I want to say "kull l-i7tiraam'' we either say "kull l-i7tiraam or " shuu... hada badna nnazillak Takiyyi":cool: So, I think, maybe other people also use it, but still it's in a very informal circles, and maybe also its the influence of Hebrew...
     
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