have a car / got a car

augustrh

Member
spanish
He estado leyendo en internet que el uso de GOT es mas en Gran Bretaña que en USA, y que se puede prescindir de él.
¿Es verdad? ¿Es exactamente lo mismo:?
I have got a car
I have a car

Si es asi, porque ponen el GOT si hace que sea más larga y para los extrajeros más complicado? Me imagino que alguna razon cultural tradicional o gramatical habrá....

Muchas gracias gente!
 
  • Her-Nann

    New Member
    Spanish
    Es verdad, he visto oraciones con y sin el "GOT" y el significado es el mismo...
    A ver quien me explica eso...
     

    jlmyth

    Senior Member
    English - Oz Español - Chile
    I have got a car más británico - el auxiliar es HAVE (o has)
    I have a car - más Americano - el auxiliar es Do o Does.
    Significado es el mismo
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    He estado leyendo en internet que el uso de GOT es mas en Gran Bretaña que en USA, y que se puede prescindir de él.
    ¿Es verdad? ¿Es exactamente lo mismo:?
    I have got a car
    I have a car
    Muchas gracias gente!
    You are absolutely right.

    BE
    Have you got a car?
    Yes I've got a car.

    AE
    Do you have a car?
    Yes I have a car.

    Of course that is a generalisation but to my English ears it's quite clear which country each version comes from.

    Why do we British add an extra verb? I have no idea. It seems crazy.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    "Got" is used in place of "have" in American English frequently, and the statement "I've got a car" or "I got a car" is very common here. The use of "got" is considered colloquial or non-standard, but it's accepted in everyday speech. The slogan "got milk?" originated here, after all.

    So are you saying that nobody in Great Britain says "I have a car" and that it would sound incorrect to say it?
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    "Got" is used in place of "have" in American English frequently, and the statement "I've got a car" or "I got a car" is very common here. The use of "got" is considered colloquial or non-standard, but it's accepted in everyday speech. The slogan "got milk?" originated here, after all.

    So are you saying that nobody in Great Britain says "I have a car" and that it would sound incorrect to say it?
    There are also those here in the UK who consider "got" colloquial, and who would not dream of using it. However, I believe it is true to say that they are very much in the minority.
    Nevertheless, I don't think that anyone here would consider "I have a car" incorrect, and yes, it is sometimes used.
     

    Chris K

    Senior Member
    English / US
    [...]

    BE
    Have you got a car?
    Yes I've got a car.

    AE
    Do you have a car?
    Yes I have a car.

    [...]
    In the US we tend to use the contracted form of I have before got: "I've got a car." And the question "have you got a car?" is perfectly idiomatic in the US, even though "I have got a car" (uncontracted) tends to sound stilted to us.
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    In the US we tend to use the contracted form of I have before got: "I've got a car." And the question "have you got a car?" is perfectly idiomatic in the US, even though "I have got a car" (uncontracted) tends to sound stilted to us.
    We also tend to use the contracted form in the UK. :)

    And "I have got a car" sounds stilted to me too unless it is said emphatically:

    -I haven't got (or "don't have" or "haven't") a bike, but I have got (or "do have") a car!
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    So augustrh. It seems that you could happily travel to Britain or the USA and use either expression. Everyone would understand you perfectly and you would not sound out of place.
     
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