have a pickle up your backside

Sherlockian

Member
Korean
Thank you for reading this thread. I'm new here and I'm a bit nervous to writing this :)

Now I'm watching a British drama called "The Hour".
One of the scenes is about reporting news in the studio in 1950's.
The news reader makes a mistake like forgetting what to say next for a while.
After that the producer who is very critical for everything comes to him and say,

"Are you in discomfort or does it just seem as if you have a pickle up your backside?"

I've never heard of the sentence really..
The dictionary says pickle means difficulty so I'm just guessing it with my imagination.
"It looks like you have some trouble with your ass" or "It looks like you want to go to the toilet" like this.
well, but considering of his personality it seems just a sarcasm if my guessing is right. Including the first sentence too?

Actually there was a thread about "pickle up one's ass" and the answer was it's the same meaning as "has a stick up ass"... they say it means prim, proper, uptight but I still have a problem to understand that sentence :(
He's teasing about the anchor's attitude? What is this mean exactly?
I'm pausing for an hour because of this expression, so I want to know literally or idiomatically.. everything.
I would be so pleased if there are some examples too.. to make it clear ;)

Please explain to me.. Thank you so much, in advance!
 
  • dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    As you can probably imagine, having a pickle planted in one's backside comes with big discomfort... so the author is asking 'Are you really in discomfort are you just behaving as though you were in discomfort?

    'Does it just seeem as if you have a pickle up your backside' is vivid, colorfoul, metaphorical language (;)), and an unusual way of asking the question in bold... it's not a fixed phrase, it's not something you'd hear very often.
     
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    Sherlockian

    Member
    Korean
    Oh, it's unusual, okay ;) But it is good to know this vivid and metaphorical expression even I don't understand 100 percent. haha.
    So.. 'Are you really uncomfortable or are you behaving just like you're uncomfortable on purpose(sarcasm?)?' it also makes sense? Have I got it wrong? or really the toilet thing only? oh it toilet thing also sounds sarcasm to me.... panic! Sorry his face and the way of speaking was very threatening I'm so confused now
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Oh, it's unusual, okay ;) But it is good to know this vivid and metaphorical expression even I don't understand 100 percent. haha.
    So.. 'Are you really uncomfortable or are you behaving just like you're uncomfortable on purpose(sarcasm?)?' it also makes sense? Have I got it wrong? or really the toilet thing only? oh it toilet thing also sounds sarcasm to me.... panic! Sorry his face and the way of speaking was very threatening I'm so confused now
    You seem to have the right idea, Sherlockian. The producer asks the news reporter whether he's really in discomfort or just appears to be in discomfort. It's a sarcastic remark about the reporter's demeanor.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Welcome to the forum, Sherlockian:)
    You're thinking of the wrong kind of pickle ~ he means something like these, vegetables preserved in vinegar. If you had one of those up your backside, it would be uncomfortable.
    I wouldn't really call it sarcasm ~ just a jokey and slightly crude way of describing his discomfort.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    When you feel uncomfortable, you make different bodily movements. I suppose that whoever asked this question - 'Are you in discomfort or does it just seem as if you have a pickle up your backside?", saw the person moving awkwardly (like the person had a pickle shoved in their...you know what), and that's what triggered the question. Yes, it is humorous, but I wouldn't quite call it sarcastic, just humorous.
     

    Sherlockian

    Member
    Korean
    You seem to have the right idea, Sherlockian. The producer asks the news reporter whether he's really in discomfort or just appears to be in discomfort. It's a sarcastic remark about the reporter's demeanor.
    You have the same thinking as me it's cool ;) Maybe it depends on viewpoint? hmm anyway thanks a lot
    and I got one more new word from your post; demeanor :)
     

    Sherlockian

    Member
    Korean
    Welcome to the forum, Sherlockian:)
    You're thinking of the wrong kind of pickle ~ he means something like these, vegetables preserved in vinegar. If you had one of those up your backside, it would be uncomfortable.
    I wouldn't really call it sarcasm ~ just a jokey and slightly crude way of describing his discomfort.
    Hah! It can be THAT pickle?! Holy cow! hah.. I've never thought about THIS pickle indeed. aha it really makes sense, funny :D
     

    Sherlockian

    Member
    Korean
    When you feel uncomfortable, you make different bodily movements. I suppose that whoever asked this question - 'Are you in discomfort or does it just seem as if you have a pickle up your backside?", saw the person moving awkwardly (like the person had a pickle shoved in their...you know what), and that's what triggered the question. Yes, it is humorous, but I wouldn't quite call it sarcastic, just humorous.
    yeah.. in their.... :p
    The member above you said the same as you, then it's really a humorous thing?!
    This expression is really funny after knowing the meaning of PICKLE! really didn't expected it would be that pickle..
    wow I think I learn a lot today from this one sentence.. but still difficult for me thanks anyway :)
     
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    Sherlockian

    Member
    Korean
    Can I ask one more question, Why are you using 'up' instead of in or on?
    If pickle is the pickle, made of cucumber, located(?) in your ass or on your ass,
    in and on are more proper expressions I think, isn't it?
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    Unusual (these days) it may be, but new it is not. In Classical Greek comedies there are, I have been told, many references to radishes being shoved up someone's backside. Human nature seems to have been much the same through the ages.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Can I ask one more question, Why are you using 'up' instead of in or on?
    If pickle is the pickle, made of cucumber, located(?) in your ass or on your ass,
    in and on are more proper expressions I think, isn't it?

    :eek: That's just how we refer to things inserted into the backside ... and often the nose.

    Have you got a pickle up your backside?
    He shoved a pencil up his sister's nose.
    etc.
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    Words to refer to one's butt/backside/ass/arse are inherently vague because they could refer to the part you sit on (the buttocks) or they could refer to the orifice associated with the backside. If you say "on your butt," it would mean on the surface - like a pimple or something. If you say "in your butt"...well, I'm not sure exactly what that means. That's a preposition that's not ordinarily used with butt. If you say "up your butt," it means only one thing, and that's shoved up the orifice.

    Now that I think about it, it's almost the same for nose, except that in that case "in your nose" means pretty much the same thing as "up your nose" - it's just a bit less emphatic.
     

    Sherlockian

    Member
    Korean
    :eek: That's just how we refer to things inserted into the backside ... and often the nose.

    Have you got a pickle up your backside?
    He shoved a pencil up his sister's nose.
    etc.
    aha that's just the way you say it? okay then I just got to memorize it ;) well somehow insert makes me blush ha!
    I've just searched 'shove up' here and I finally got the right meaning of this..
    because I couldn't find it in my Korean dictionary, dictionary .com or Google also...
    This website is just the best for me ;) Thank you for explaining to me
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    :) You may not have noticed that you can access lots of dictionaries* on this site ~ the blank box at the top of every page. (Here's our dictionary's entry for shove.)

    * As well as thousands and thousands of previous threads:)
     

    Sherlockian

    Member
    Korean
    Words to refer to one's butt/backside/ass/arse are inherently vague because they could refer to the part you sit on (the buttocks) or they could refer to the orifice associated with the backside. If you say "on your butt," it would mean on the surface - like a pimple or something. If you say "in your butt"...well, I'm not sure exactly what that means. That's a preposition that's not ordinarily used with butt. If you say "up your butt," it means only one thing, and that's shoved up the orifice.

    Now that I think about it, it's almost the same for nose, except that in that case "in your nose" means pretty much the same thing as "up your nose" - it's just a bit less emphatic.
    wow BIG thanks for your kind explanation! It's very practical!!
    We have another hole on the face, the mouth. It's also the same as nose I guess?
    A lot of new words today ooh so cool :D

    well, umm I really didn't want to ask you this but is it related to poop sometimes? or often?
     

    Sherlockian

    Member
    Korean
    :) You may not have noticed that you can access lots of dictionaries* on this site ~ the blank box at the top of every page. (Here's our dictionary's entry for shove.)

    * As well as thousands and thousands of previous threads:)
    Thanks for the link! There are so many links except this expression ;)
     

    Sherlockian

    Member
    Korean
    in your mouth and down your throat, okay :)
    I'm really bad at prepositions so they're all helpful thanks
    How nice of you guys!! :thumbsup:
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    aha that's just the way you say it? okay then I just got to memorize it ;)
    Think of the body as standing up even if the body you're talking about is lying down. Toward the top of the head is up (up the nostrils), toward the feet is down (down the throat) and horizontal is "in" (in the mouth, in the ear),
     

    Sherlockian

    Member
    Korean
    Think of the body as standing up even if the body you're talking about is lying down. Toward the top of the head is up (up the nostrils), toward the feet is down (down the throat) and horizontal is "in" (in the mouth, in the ear),
    wow this makes me so much easier to say! It's absolutely different expression from Korean ;) I'll always keep this in mind
     
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