have a subscription/sign up for

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hi there

I'd like to know what's the difference between having a subscription and signing up for? For example, if I am talking about Internet service provider, which one should I use?

"I don't have any subscription to any Internet service provider" or "I didn't sign up for any Internet service provider"?
"I will get a subscription to an Internet service provider" or "I will sign up for an Internet service provider"?

Thank you for all
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I don't think there is much difference, they seem very equivalent to me.
    Personally, I would use "subscribe" as a verb not "subscription" as a noun. "I have not subscribed ... "
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I don't think there is much difference, they seem very equivalent to me.
    Personally, I would use "subscribe" as a verb not "subscription" as a noun. "I have not subscribed ... "
    But is "subcribe" better than "sign up for"? ... Wouldn't you say things like "I will get a subscription to an Internet service provider or "Get your supscription to The Economist now"
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I don't think one is "better" than the other. One sounds a bit more formal than the other, perhaps, but not better / worse. Both are equally valid.

    No, I would not say I will get a subscription to a net provider. What I actually say about my internet provider is probably a mix of get / sort out / arrange etc. e.g. "I've still got to sort out an internet provider" sounds very natural to me. Or "I fixed up my internet yesterday".

    I do "subscribe" to somethings, magazines mainly.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I don't think one is "better" than the other. One sounds a bit more formal than the other, perhaps, but not better / worse. Both are equally valid.

    No, I would not say I will get a subscription to a net provider. What I actually say about my internet provider is probably a mix of get / sort out / arrange etc. e.g. "I've still got to sort out an internet provider" sounds very natural to me. Or "I fixed up my internet yesterday".

    I do "subscribe" to somethings, magazines mainly.
    But wouldn't you say "I will subscribe to/sign up for a net provider" either? ...

    Or maybe "I'll lock my internet thing down tomorrow"?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would say ' . . . sign up with an internet provider'. You don't sign up for a net provider, you sign up for the service that a internet provider provides.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I would say ' . . . sign up with an internet provider'. You don't sign up for a net provider, you sign up for the service that a internet provider provides.
    But would it work? "I will sign up with T-mobile tomorrow" "I will sign up with Sky"... Does it mean "I will lock this Internet thing down tomorrow"?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "I will sign up with T-mobile tomorrow" :tick:

    "I will sign up with Sky" :tick:

    "I will lock this Internet thing down tomorrow" :confused: Some might say this I suppose, but not me.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    "I will sign up with T-mobile tomorrow" :tick:

    "I will sign up with Sky" :tick:

    "I will lock this Internet thing down tomorrow" :confused: Some might say this I suppose, but not me.
    Why "some

    I got it. But why did you say 'sign up with" and not "sign up for " or sign up to"? Don't you sign up to/for Facebook?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Why "some
    There may be some people who would say "I will lock this Internet thing down tomorrow", but I can't imagine there will be very many..

    But why did you say 'sign up with" and not "sign up for " or sign up to"?
    I answered this in my post #6.

    Don't you sign up to/for Facebook?
    I don't know. I know nothing about Facebook. I guess I'd follow whatever wording they use.
     

    souplady

    Senior Member
    english - united states
    Personally, "sign up with" sounds strange to me. Maybe it's a dialect thing since I'm from across the pond, but I can't think of a single context where I wouldn't use "sign up for."

    Perhaps it's due to a different way of conceptualizing the company vs. the service. I would think almost anybody hears the word Facebook and they primarily conceptualize it as a social networking service, not the company that provides the service. And just like heypresto said, you sign up for a service, which is why everybody says 'sign up for Facebook'.

    I'd personally say "sign up for T-mobile", and T-mobile is serving here as shorthand for "internet service provided by the company T-mobile." So it's still a focus on the service/product rather than the company as a business entity.

    As for "to", you wouldn't ever use that unless it was specifically part of a verb infinitive. "I want to sign up to skydive." But you can also turn the infinitive into a gerund, which acts as a noun, and you're back to 'for'. "I want to sign up for skydiving."
     
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