have acupuncture

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lgr632525968

Senior Member
Chinese
I had acupuncture in my lower back.

I wonder if " have acupuncture " is a correct expression. If it is, what verbs can also be used to describe acupuncture?

Thank you.
 
  • Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Since acupuncture is not common known to many foreigners, perhaps "receive" is a good word. (Not a native speaker of English.)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    "Have" is correct. Offhand, I can't think of another verb, but that might change with a different context.
     

    Wordnip

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, it is quite usual to talk of going to have acupuncture (I had acupuncture; I will have acupuncture etc.) Acupuncture is well known in Australia and probably in the UK.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    I had acupuncture in my lower back.
    Unfortunately, this wording makes it sound like acupuncture is a disease!
    I think it would be better to say:
    I had acupuncture (treatments) for my lower back.

    You can have acupuncture for something (a certain condition such as back pain, migraines, etc.);
    you can go for acupuncture treatments;
    you can receive acupuncture treatments...

    Acupuncture is practiced in the United States and is a familiar concept even among those who have not experienced it.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I don't agree with Language Hound that "I had acupuncture in my lower back" would be misunderstood by anyone. As LH later comments, acupuncture is indeed a familiar term here, and no one would think it a disease. The sentence is fine.
     

    Agrippa

    Member
    France - French
    I agree with Language Hound: "acupuncture in one's back" suggests that acupuncture is a disease.


    As for the OP's question, I'd go with:

    I had acupuncture performed on my lower back.
     

    Agrippa

    Member
    France - French
    Sorry, but that just seems wordy to me.
    Sir, "wordy" does not mean incorrect, and the tendency of many North American English speakers to cut, trim, and deformalize to "get to the point" should not be understated.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't agree with Language Hound that "I had acupuncture in my lower back" would be misunderstood by anyone.
    Well, I don't think it would be understood by anyone who knows how acupuncture is done.
    I would not use "...acupuncture in my lower back" or "acupuncture on my lower back."
    I would only use "...acupuncture for my lower back."
    The reason is that acupuncture needles are placed in the meridian that corresponds to the area needing treatment.
    Someone being treated for lower back pain would not have needles placed in their lower back.
    For that reason, I find the statement "I had acupuncture in/on my lower back" pretty much meaningless.

    The particular wording of "I had acupuncture in my lower back" really sounds to me like something along the lines of
    "He has osteoarthritis in his knee."
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with those who abhor "in" and "on" in this context, and for both reasons. "In" makes acupuncture sound like a disease, and "on" like a carbuncle. Although acupuncture for low back pain is usually local, there may well be needles elsewhere, and when I had it, it was "for" my lower back pain.
     
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