have an interest in

Daab

Senior Member
Korean
Here is the context and the sentence that I am curious about.

For example, an audience member can be rationally persuaded by an arguer's argument only if the arguer's attempt at rational persuasion is successful. So each party has an interest in working cooperatively with the other.

I wonder if the expression "to have an interest in" here can mean "to benefit from" or "to be interested in."
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Here is the context and the sentence that I am curious about.

    For example, an audience member can be rationally persuaded by an arguer's argument only if the arguer's attempt at rational persuasion is successful. So each party has an interest in working cooperatively with the other.

    I wonder if the expression "to have an interest in" here can mean "to benefit from" :tick: or "to be interested in :cross:."
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    It means "to benefit from" and not "to be interested in" something in the sense of being curious about it or having a hobby. Consider;
    1) I have an interest in the company. - I have shares, or some other financial stake, in the company.
    2) People have an interest in what the government does. - People are affected by what the government does.
    3) I've sold my house so I no longer have an interest in whether the council wants to build a new road next to it. - The new road won't affect me.
     

    stevenst

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    It means "to benefit from" and not "to be interested in" something in the sense of being curious about it or having a hobby. Consider;
    1) I have an interest in the company. - I have shares, or some other financial stake, in the company.
    2) People have an interest in what the government does. - People are affected by what the government does.
    3) I've sold my house so I no longer have an interest in whether the council wants to build a new road next to it. - The new road won't affect me.
    so "to have an interest in something" is equal to "to benefit from something"
    and "to have interest in something" is equal to " to be interested in something"
    Is my understanding correct?
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't think you can say "have interest in something."
    1) I'm interested in history.
    2) I think history's interesting.
    3) I find history interesting.
    These mean more or less the same thing, although (1) suggests to me a more active interest than the other two. (3) is a little more formal than (2).
    4) I'm not interested in his excuses. - I don't wish to listen to his excuses.
    But yes. "Have an interest in" refers to how something will affect you, although the idea of benefit, if it's there, need not be explicitly stated.
    5) Even people without children have an interest in what schools do. - Everyone benefits when children receive a good education.
    6) The council closed the library without consulting anyone who had an interest. - The people who benefited from using the library weren't consulted.
    7) I have an interest in the council's proposal for a new road. - Any new road will affect me but not necessarily to my advantage.
    (Interest also has a financial meaning in "My investments yielded a 5% interest.")
     
    Last edited:

    stevenst

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    I don't think you can say "have interest in something."
    1) I'm interested in history.
    2) I think history's interesting.
    3) I find history interesting.
    These mean more or less the same thing, although (1) suggests to me a more active interest than the other two. (3) is a little more formal than (2).
    4) I'm not interested in his excuses. - I don't wish to listen to his excuses.
    But yes. "Have an interest in" refers to how something will affect you, although the idea of benefit, if it's there, need not be explicitly stated.
    5) Even people without children have an interest in what schools do. - Everyone benefits when children receive a good education.
    6) The council closed the library without consulting anyone who had an interest. - The people who benefited from using the library weren't consulted.
    7) I have an interest in the council's proposal for a new road. - Any new road will affect me but not necessarily to my advantage.
    (Interest also has a financial meaning in "My investments yielded a 5% interest.")
    Thanks for your detailed explanation, I know more about the usage of the word "interest"now.:)
    According to your several examples, "to have an interest in something" seems mostly to refer "to benefit from something", but not necessarily.The exact meaning of it really depends on its context.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Hi, I'd like to see if I'm right about this:
    If you replace "have" with "take", it will probably take on the meaning of "start getting interested in something"

    The millionaire has taken an interest in an arduous lifestyle
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top