have been liking, knowing, remaining...

stephenlearner

Senior Member
Chinese
According to a grammar book, some verbs can't be used in progressive forms, such as like, wish, know, believe, remember, forget, appear, remain, etc.

However, in COCA*, I've found these sentences:

>>you're my kinda woman. I like you. I been liking you for a long time, ever since I first seen you in the bank
<...>
>> in life. I can see it. I know her. I've been knowing her all of my life. I know that she's resilient. " When
<...>
>>world were investigating the phenomenon. Over the last couple of days I've been remembering how as a child I could not manage to sit' properly' in assemblies
<...>
>> the dioceses that broke off. However, a small portion of us have been remaining faithful to the Episcopal Church, and it's just really exciting to finally,

Are these sentences substandard?

Thanks.

*COCA: Corpus of Contemporary American English

<Additional example sentences removed by moderator (Florentia52)>
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Which grammar book?
    It seems a bit prescriptive and not in touch with the way we actually use language, as shown by your COCA examples.

    Most of them ones you quote here seem perfcetly standard to me, apart from this: I've been knowing her all of my life. I know that she's resilient. :cross:
     

    stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Which grammar book?
    It seems a bit prescriptive and not in touch with the way we actually use language, as shown by your COCA examples.
    I don't think we can say
    I'm liking,
    I'm wishing,
    I'm believing
    ...
    Maybe these verbs behave differently in the present progressive than in the present perfect progressive.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I don't think we can say
    I'm liking,
    I'm wishing,
    I'm believing
    ...
    Maybe these verbs behave differently in the present progressive than in the present perfect progressive.
    In some cases we can.:

    I didn't like this book at first, but I'm liking it more now as I read on.
    Now I'm really wishing I hadn't made that hotel reservation
    .

    "I'm believing" might be a bit harder to use.
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I don't think we can say
    I'm liking,
    I'm wishing,
    I'm believing
    ...
    Maybe these verbs behave differently in the present progressive than in the present perfect progressive.
    Of course you can.

    I am wishing on a falling star.

    I have been wishing for my own pony since I was 5 years old.

    I'm liking this song more and more.

    I have been liking her music for years.

    I'm believing his story more since we got extra details.

    I have been believing in the possibility of social change since I was 21, but am losing faith now.

    I don't know where some of these "English rules" get invented, honestly.
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    On this web page Present continuous | English grammar | EF you can see this rule. It is near the bottom. I think this page is written by native speakers. And I can find lots of web pages like this.
    It says "not usually." It doesn't say never.

    Yes these rules are written *by* native speakers. But they are written *for* English learners. No native speaker learns this "rule" because it isn't really a rule. It is an interim guideline for people beginning to learn English and presumably there's some egregious common error learners would make if they didn't follow this guideline.

    But it's not a rule because there are many useful and necessary and totally correct sentences we can make with the gerund form of these verbs. Indeed, as others have indicated, the gerund form of these "stative" nouns has become more popular over the past several decades.

    There is a similar thread going on about "gradable" and "ungradable" adjectives. Like that thread, this one here is not really about grammar, meaning not really about the structure of English. Rather, it is about meaning and usage, and those things continually evolve in English.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    There’s a big difference between “not usually” and never.
    Your misreading of the “rules” creates a problem for you.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Are these sentences substandard?
    People often deviate from the usual rules of language, often intentionally, and often with the intention to grab attention or subvert, or sometimes in an attempt to add a shade of meaning. I don’t think the word “substandard” applies here.

    This may be specially true in areas where grammar and lexis meet, such as stative verbs and countable/uncountable nouns.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top