have children will travel

4faces

Senior Member
Korea
Hi all,

There's a website named "havechildrenwilltravel."
Well, it must mean something.. ^^, but it's totally beyond me.
I did some research on the net and found some more expressions with the similar structure. Here they are.

  • Have computer will podcast
  • Have Coffee Will Write
  • Have funds will invest
It goes on and on and on... Pls, somebody enlighten me on this.

4faces.. ^)^
 
  • germinal

    Senior Member
    England English
    4faces said:
    Hi all,

    There's a website named "havechildrenwilltravel."
    Well, it must mean something.. ^^, but it's totally beyond me.
    I did some research on the net and found some more expressions with the similar structure. Here they are.
    • Have computer will podcast
    • Have Coffee Will Write
    • Have funds will invest
    It goes on and on and on... Pls, somebody enlighten me on this.

    4faces.. ^)^

    This handy form of words is usually used in adverts where someone has certain skills or equipment and hopes to find employment where they can be used.

    Have gun will travel is a well known one which may be from a book or a film about a hired gunslinger/assassin looking for business. :)


    Germinal.


    .
     

    Helicopta

    Senior Member
    England - English (Learning Spanish)
    As Germinal says, it's quite a common structure. The website offers family adventure holidays that wouldn't suit people without children. "I have children so now I'm going to take them on a holiday for all the family"
     

    la grive solitaire

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    As others have said, the "Have ____, will ____" is a kind of humourous linguistic formula. For example, a chef might say, "Have food, will travel," a bricklayer, "Have trowel, will travel," a cellist, "Have cello, will travel." Although I've most often heard it with "travel", you can fill in any words you like.
    I found this for "Have gun, will travel": http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050025/
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Have Gun, Will Travel was a famous TV series in the 1950's and '60's. It was about a hired gun named Palladin. It was sort-of like the reality show Bounty Hunter, except that it was all a written script. He would right wrongs in the old west, bring in crooked sheriffs, get back some widow's money that her husband died to get and now someone had stolen--that generally kind-of save-the-day sort of stuff.

    As far as I know, that's how the Have ________ will _______ saying got started.

    Cheers!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It originally meant, more or less, "Gun for hire - I have my own gun and I am willing to travel for work".

    The alternative versions do not all include that meaning, which is sad.
     
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