Have decided/decided...... + this year?

nosaijin

Senior Member
Taiwanese Mandarin
Hello:

I saw the question below posted in another forum:

The staffing committee ______ to recruit more than 100 new employees for an ambitious project this year.

(A) decision (B) has decided (C) decided (D) was decided


The original poster said the given answer is C, wondering why B is invalid. (I think B & C are both possible, by the way)

Some supporters of the given answer then argued that perfect tense indicates somebody keeps doing something from past to present,

and in the question the committee is unlikely to "decide several times from past to now", so B is unlikely.

Other supporters claimed that perfect tense cannot be used with "this year", hence C.

The two statements can't really convince me, and in Cambridge dictionary it says present perfect is often used with certain time expressions, including "this year".
Past simple or present perfect? - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary


So, what would you say? Are those defenders correct or not? Thank you.
 
Last edited:
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    In AE, both B and C are correct.

    Note that "this year" is future, and talks about when the project will happen, after the recruiting. "This year" is not when the decision was made.

    in Cambridge dictionary it says present perfect is often used with certain time expressions, including "this year".
    Here "used with" does not mean "nearby" or "in the same sentence". It means that "this year" applies to the action which the verb describes. In your example "this year" is not about the "decide" action.
     

    nosaijin

    Senior Member
    Taiwanese Mandarin
    Thank you, dojibear.

    What should I say if the decision was made in "this year", then? And could you please explain more about this:

    It means that "this year" applies to the action which the verb describes.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "The staffing committee decided this year..."
    "This year the staffing commitee decided..."

    That is how you write the sentence if the decision was made during "this year".

    The sentence in post #1 says:

    for an ambitious project this year.
    Here "this year" describes "ambitious project". When will this project happen? This year.
     

    nosaijin

    Senior Member
    Taiwanese Mandarin
    "The staffing committee decided this year..."
    "This year the staffing commitee decided..."

    That is how you write the sentence if the decision was made during "this year".

    The sentence in post #1 says:


    Here "this year" describes "ambitious project". When will this project happen? This year.
    Much appreciated:)
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The staffing committee ______ to recruit more than 100 new employees for an ambitious project this year.

    (A) decision (B) has decided (C) decided (D) was decided
    In BE, both B and C are correct. :)

    And also (D) is correct: in this case "decided" is an adjective = having or demonstrating a fixed resolve; determined, resolute:

    1993 A. L. Kennedy Looking for Possible Dance 126 "He never went near a doctor, if he could help it... And you could never talk him round, he was very decided."

    Regrettably, a lot of Chinese text books have poor questions in them. :oops:

    "This year, the staffing committee decided to recruit more than 100 new employees" -> at this stage the decision has probably been implemented. I would expect "and so we will be interviewing candidates in the coming months."

    "This year, the staffing committee has decided to recruit more than 100 new employees" -> This sounds like a spoken/written announcement of very recent news about the committee - at this stage the decision has probably not been implemented. The project is in the early stages.
     

    nosaijin

    Senior Member
    Taiwanese Mandarin
    In BE, both B and C are correct. :)

    And also (D) is correct: in this case "decided" is an adjective = having or demonstrating a fixed resolve; determined, resolute:
    Thank you, PaulQ. As helpful as usual!

    I'm surprised that (D) is also correct. This seems to be a poor question:eek:
     
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