have/eat BBQ [barbecue]

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mikichan

Senior Member
Chinese
What do native speakers say to eat the dish called "BBQ"?

1. I had [BBQ/some BBQ] yesterday.----I think this one is correct for both [BBQ/some BBQ], am I right?
2. I had a BBQ yesterday.---I think it means "I organized the event where I cooked BBQ yesterday." Am I right?

I wrote all of them but if they sound strange, please let me know how you would say it as a native speaker.

Thank you.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello mikichan

    You might find this previous thread interesting: Barbecue x Barbecued meat.

    For me, "barbecue" means either
    - an outdoor grill on which to cook things; or
    - an event at which food is cooked on an outdoor grill.

    "Barbecue", to me, doesn't refer to the food itself.

    It seems from the previous thread, though, that "barbecue" can mean "barbecued meat" in some parts of the English-speaking world:).
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ... It seems from the previous thread, though, that "barbecue" can mean "barbecued meat" in some parts of the English-speaking world:).
    It certainly does in most parts of the U.S., though some folks from the U.K. don't consider us "part of the English-speaking world." :D
     
    Hi. First of all, you would need to actually use the word "barbecue," not BBQ, I don't know what that is, but it sounds like a commercial name for a chain restaurant or particular brand name. It would be like saying "I had PKDK yesterday." because I thought that means "peking duck" to the rest of the world, when it would mean nothing to most people.

    It is possible to say "I had pizza/barbecue/peking duck/ yesterday, or had some_____and have them mean pretty much the same thing.

    Yes, "I had a barbecue yesterday" would be possible to mean I organized the event, but that sounds too passive to me, I think it would be more likely said in active voice "I gave a barbecue yesterday." (Or even your own word, "I organized a barbecue....", but I think the simpler gave is more common)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It certainly does in most parts of the U.S.
    I hadn't realised from the previous thread that it was widespread (universal?):eek:
    though some folks from the U.K. don't consider us "part of the English-speaking world." :D
    I've never met anyone who feels that way, Egmont. I apologise if my reference to "part of the English-speaking world" was inadvertently objectionable:(.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I hadn't realised from the previous thread that it was widespread (universal?):eek:I've never met anyone who feels that way, Egmont. I apologise if my reference to "part of the English-speaking world" was inadvertently objectionable:(.
    Not in the least. I thought it was a successful attempt at humor. Really.

    (My English and Scottish friends who say that say it with tongue in cheek, usually over a pint - or, in the case of the Scots, a wee dram.)
     

    sandpiperlily

    Senior Member
    Even within the US this is a regional difference.

    In the Southeast and parts of the midwest, where the dish itself originates, BBQ only means that specific dish. Not any food cooked on an outdoor grill is barbecue, and not all events serving food grilled outdoors are barbecues. Each region has its own style of barbecue (pork v beef, dry rub vs wet sauce, vinegar and spice level, etc) and people from each state will tell you theirs is the best!

    However, in much of the rest of the US, barbecue includes anything cooked on a grill, and a barbecue is any event where food is grilled outdoors.

    More than you probably ever wanted to know: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbecue_in_the_United_States
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    sandpiper's post sums it up. There is a veritable BBQ culture (top-notch restaurants, contests, secret recipes) in the USA, and there is BBQ light, which means grilling in your back yard or in a public park or on the beach, etc.

    For eating within the BBQ culture, I'd say: I had BBQ.

    The only question that might come up is "pork or beef", to my knowledge.

    For an event/party with a grill:
    I had a BBQ.
    I held a BBQ.
    I threw a BBQ.

    I actually wouldn't use "gave a BBQ", Dale, but I can't explain why very well.
     
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