"have enough time" or "have enough of time"?

pinky88

Member
Vietnamese
<< "have enough time" or "have enough of time"? >>

Hi all,

I wonder whether beside the difference in grammatical functions of "enough" in the 2 phrases (the 1st one is a determiner, and the 2nd one is the pronoun), is there any difference in their meanings?

Thanks a lot for your help. : )
 
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  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello pink88.

    Please give us a complete sentence in which you might use these phrases.

    (I can't think of a context in which I would say 'enough of time', though there may be one. I would say 'enough of' other things.)

    Cross-posted.

    Added: For examples in which we would use 'enough of', see this thread:
    enough vs enough of
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If you have plenty of the fabric, you have a large amount of the fabric. A large amount should be more than enough for any order. "We do not have plenty" is not really meaningful - you might have the amount needed.
    (There is not a separate dictionary entry for every possible combination of words. There is no entry for "plenty of" either.)
     

    pinky88

    Member
    Vietnamese
    So, in this case we can't use "plenty of" as the meaning is not appropriate. How about the meaning of "enough of the fabric" in this case? I think that it does not mean "unwillingness to tolerate", is it correct?

    And once again, do "have enough fabric" and "have enough of the fabric" have the same meaning?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "I have had enough of your foolishness!" means I have had a large quantity of your foolishness so I do not need anymore. That is the type of context in which "enough" is used for anything remotely like "unwilling to tolerate" and that is the implication not the direct meaning. I can't imagine a context in which someone would be so frustrated by fabric that they would yell about it. We need full sentences and contexts to determine correct grammar and meaning.
    I have enough fabric. :tick: I have the correct quantity of fabric (and possibly more). Fabric is being used generally, not a specific fabric.
    I have enough of fabric. :cross:
    I have enough of the fabric. :tick: I have the correct quantity of some specific fabric which has been mentioned before.
    I have enough of the fabric that you wanted. :tick:
     
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