(have) got/have someone <adjective>

NotToBeAnnoyingBut

Member
Spanish - Bolivia
Context: My girlfriend (let's ignore the fact that I don't have and can't seem to get one) is flirting with another guy right in front of me, can I respond saying 'That (has) got (or has) me mad'?
 
  • espider

    Senior Member
    English
    For a single event in the past, now over, "that got (or made) me mad". If you are still annoyed up to the time of speaking, "that has got/made me mad".
     

    NotToBeAnnoyingBut

    Member
    Spanish - Bolivia
    For a single event in the past, now over, "that got (or made) me mad". If you are still annoyed up to the time of speaking, "that has got/made me mad".
    Oh, you must've misunderstood. I was asking if it's ok to use it in that particular context, you know. Thanks anyway :)
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Context: My girlfriend (let's ignore the fact that I don't have and can't seem to get one) is flirting with another guy right in front of me, can I respond saying 'That (has) got (or has) me mad'?
    Yes you can, but you need the "got". It doesn't work (or not for me, anyway) as just "that has me mad".
     

    NotToBeAnnoyingBut

    Member
    Spanish - Bolivia
    Yes you can, but you need the "got". It doesn't work (or not for me, anyway) as just "that has me mad".
    How come you can have 'that has me freaking out', then? I always thought 'you have (got) me <adjective>' was based on 'you have (got) me doing'. And that's how 'you have (got) me do' and 'you have (got) me doing' are different. Yes, I do realize 'you have (got) me do' sounds weird, but let me put it in context; 'You see that brunette over there? She has me do the dishes every morning', meaning she pays me to do the dishes every morning. Am I missing something here or what?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    How come you can have 'that has me freaking out', then? I always thought 'you have (got) me <adjective>' was based on 'you have (got) me doing'. And that's how 'you have (got) me do' and 'you have (got) me doing' are different. Yes, I do realize 'you have (got) me do' sounds weird, but let me put it in context; 'You see that brunette over there? She has me do the dishes every morning', meaning she pays me to do the dishes every morning. Am I missing something here or what?
    I think what you're missing there is that "mad" is an adjective whereas both "freaking out" and "doing the dishes" are verbal constructions.

    I'm not enough of a grammarian to explain why that makes a difference, but I'm pretty sure it does. :)
     

    NotToBeAnnoyingBut

    Member
    Spanish - Bolivia
    I think what you're missing there is that "mad" is an adjective whereas both "freaking out" and "doing the dishes" are verbal constructions.

    I'm not enough of a grammarian to explain why that makes a difference, but I'm pretty sure it does. :)
    Got it! No words can express how grateful I am, thank you so much, good sir/ma'am! :)
     
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